Author Topic: Plasma Power Supply  (Read 1083 times)

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2019, 00:31:11 am »
I tried blowing just compressed air through the arc.  This produced a cone shape, as with the jet torch, but not as long.  Also, rather than a red color, the blown arc was a blueish gray.  I interpret this as indicating the presence of Dark Energy.  (Gray is low intensity black.) When an electrode, such as an arc, is conducting exotic energy, Dark Energy will appear across the face of any notches or depressions in the surface.  With the blown arc, the plasmoid will stretch at various points, producing voids.  Dark Energy extends the surface across these voids.  This may provide a mechanism for producing excess energy, sourced by the ambient light combining with the exotic energy to produce the black color.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2019, 08:31:23 am »
are you going to try doping ?
there might be some interesting rocks out your way, glass maybe
the plasma might polarise a molten mass, maybe make home grown semi conductors.
do you have shielding around the trans etc , never know what is radiating . maybe experiment inside an empty mic oven case …?

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2019, 19:46:08 pm »
I do have a good collection of small rocks I've accumulated, intending to do some plasma mining experiments.  The doping suggestion, for semiconductors, also makes me think about touching the plasma jet with some flux, to help melt the rock.  So there's two good ideas right there.  (Thanks). Melting the rock would be easier if the rock itself were one of the electrodes, which is feasible with a high enough potential.  (Selective voltage electrolysis could then separate specific elements from the melt.) And I tried the circuit with a much smaller cap, to prevent overheating.  It still produces ionizing radiation, as evidenced by the green plasma when I use copper wire electrodes.  With flame added, the #14 wire melts immediately.  And shielding is a really good idea.  I've found that emi can be blocked with a sheet of paper covered with three layers of VCR tape, at least in the 100W range.  I'll have to find out if it will shield longitudinal energy.  When I use two coils for the inductor, wired in series on a MOT core, I get a metallic sound from the arc - the loudest 'ping' I've gotten so far.  It's very important to shield this because Tesla reported that LE will convert mass into ether, cleaning a metallic film from the inside of an evacuated glass tube.  I'll investigate this further, for mining.  I saw an illustration back in the 50's showing how the chemical ether can be recondensed around a seed particle of a desired substance.  (That comic book was called "The beam of light heading for the Earth" and seems to describe the Temple 1 impact experiment).

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2019, 04:27:04 am »

I don't know how or what John Hutchinson was up to but he collected rocks
they use plasma for cutting thru rocks . I saw one of those house restoration shows in Scotland, middle of no where and the guy cut thru a thick wall so all that stuff is doable.
I haven't done HV arc stuff for a while , the image of partly seeing thru my fingers kindve put me off, so shielding is a good idea for any hv ...interesting to watch someone else tho …;)

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2019, 18:50:32 pm »
It sounds like you may have discovered Angel Light.  I read about some guy who built an apparatus around 20 feet long, with multiple arc outputs which were collimated into a single, non dispersive beam which he claimed could shoot down a satellite.  France agreed to buy it for a hundred million, but I don't remember if he was prosecuted for fraud when it didn't pan out, which often happens to greedy inventors who think they'll cash in on the weapons market.  And there's also the moral issue.  Through the wall indecent surveillance should be prohibited, and anyone who uses that light as a pleasure weapon should receive a maximum sanction.  So you're right to be apprehensive; some things in this world should just be left alone.  But there's surely other hv effects you can still play with?  I'll be happy when I can explode a candle flame (including its water vapor) inside a rocket nozzle, or combustion cylinder, with a minimal amount of energy.  And slicing through solid rock will also be of value.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2019, 03:21:03 am »
the show was a tv show not me going to Scotland  ;)

in the old experiment books like pop mechanics etc they always use ford T coils which is what I used. the core is a cluster of iron wire , could probably use a contact set each end.
theyre good in the way they are self governing make n break

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2019, 05:37:34 am »
That's a clue right there.  The vibrator can be tuned so the arc produces 'splatter voltage'. (Crank the tension screw in a ways, then slowly back it out till you hear a frying sound in the arc). If that's what produces the light-like energy, you can see it through a wall if your eyes are sensitive.  Or pick it, or it's reflection, up with a ccd camera.  Tesla designed the coil for Ford.  And you can buy reeds a half dozen at a time on EBay.  I used to play with those ignition coil boxes when I was a little kid, down on the farm, and someone seemingly popped out of thin air one day and showed me how to tune it.

edit:  For shielding, a half inch of hardwood will block it, but not sheet rock.  If it's blue, it'll go through a thin sheet of aluminium on plywood.  And orange goes through cement blocks and stucco.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2019, 06:00:50 am by tektrical »

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #15 on: August 06, 2019, 05:15:46 am »
I'm still working with this, testing all the variables and permutations.  The loudest metallic sound from the arc is with two MOT primary coils on the same core for the inductor, as long as the input is on the outside  of one coil and the output is on the inside of the other, with the other wires tied together.  This produces a strong attraction between the two coils each time the arc rattles.  When the in and out is on the same side of the coils, they bounce apart when the arc fires, without the metallic sound.  When only one coil is connected, and the other is shorted, there's still the bouncing repulsion.  Also, using two secondary coils for the inductor never produces the metallic sound.

I set up a cell and connected it to the second primary coil, rather than just shorting the coil, and this produces some pretty big bubbles, but no repulsion between the two coils on the core.  The cell is a 3/4" mesh grid around an 1/8" ss rod, and the arc fires around five or six times per second.

When the metallic sounding arc fires, this induces a steep inductive pulse in the second coil.  When the shunt arc goes out, the second coil's pulse falls off rapidly.  So this resembles Meyer's waveform, with a lower frequency, due to the wide gap between the cell's electrodes.

These steep inductive pulses, or spikes, are sometimes, erroneously, referred to as 'radiant' pulses.  In reality, the pulses don't become radiant until they hit a resistance and turn outwards, moving perpendicular to the circuit.  Since the water cell has a resistance, does this mean that Meyer's technology uses radiant energy?