Author Topic: Plasma Power Supply  (Read 1084 times)

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2019, 05:31:04 am »
so the material the car is made from = iron , magnetism is likely

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #33 on: August 30, 2019, 17:27:36 pm »
That vibrating flux can be rather nasty, especially if it includes a high end beat frequency component in the single wire driver circuit, such as water's resonant MW frequency.


Meanwhile, I modified my power supply circuit to make it tunable.  Basically, I moved the diode across the spark gap, which is now connected to a second capacitor.  And another gap for the inductor's output.  This gap represents the load connection points.  The new circuit fires with an 1/8" spark gap.  Before, I had to set it around 1/32".  Using two oven caps, the output spark is a lot fatter than the one across a single gap, and can be stretched like a normal MOT arc.  With a nano Farad cap for C2 the spark in that gap is really thin, like it doesn't hardly have any current. So current can be minimized through component selection.  The first cap, together with the inductor, is a tuned circuit pumped by the cap and diode oscillator.  So changing the values of the first cap and/or the inductor will determine the frequency.  In theory, this will work with just about any voltage, if the gaps are replaced with low value resistors.  I don't have an issue with mixing alternating and direct current.  When the AC switches polarity it's cancelled out, otherwise, it adds to the DC.  So this is a good way to 'intensify' a given potential.  With an opportunity to minimize the amps.  At a desired frequency.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #34 on: October 02, 2019, 01:00:57 am »
I was allowed to salvage some big SCRs from a refridgerator-sized Power Conditioning Cabinet when I worked as a contract electrician at a chip production plant, where I helped them upgrade their equipment.  This component is rated for 100A at 600V.  Each of these came on a 5" cube shaped heat sink.  The white wire is the gate input and the small red wire is for commutation.  The light dimmer also has an SCR, and when it's gated on, the output can trigger the larger one.  This will allow me to chop the leading edge of an applied sine wave.  To also chop the trailing edge, I'll have to use a higher frequency signal, with a negative-going DC offset (provided by running the dimmer's output through a small LV transformer's secondary, or else, just a battery).  An SCR will turn off when the commutating signal's negative magnitude is greater than that of the positive current which is being conducted.  So this will also work with 12 VDC, in case I want to use a MOT's filament winding as the primary, fed with 12V sliver pulses.  I'll post a schematic showing how to connect the commutating diode when I get it wired up and verify the operation.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2019, 03:33:32 am »
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« Last Edit: October 07, 2019, 05:34:34 am by tektrical »

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #36 on: January 20, 2020, 23:04:57 pm »
hi long time no here, but the transformer will put out 2,000V ac  then if the diode is connected correctly with the capacitor you should get 4,000Volt DC half wave.
 have you any pictures? I am interested as I have got my plasma unit working real well but different to how you have done it i expect.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #37 on: January 20, 2020, 23:08:11 pm »
I do have some bigger scr's than that one 500A   are you playing around with resonant circuits?

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #38 on: January 21, 2020, 05:04:11 am »
hi long time no here, but the transformer will put out 2,000V ac  then if the diode is connected correctly with the capacitor you should get 4,000Volt DC half wave.
 have you any pictures? I am interested as I have got my plasma unit working real well but different to how you have done it i expect.

Pictures with a ccd camera produce a 'burned' image which doesn't demonstrate a key factor, which is that a Plasmoid is opaque.  If you can see into and through your hydrogen plasma, it's not a Plasmoid.

And the oven cap is designed to be in resonance with the transformer.  What I don't have at this point is a resonant pickup circuit for the fusion energy output.  This would be a loosely wound coil around the spark, with its own (tuning) capacitor.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 18:26:29 pm by tektrical »

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #39 on: January 21, 2020, 18:25:09 pm »
My train of thought was disrupted to some extent back when I was discussing all of this, so I haven't looked at it for a while.  However, by my own definition the MOT circuit isn't producing a Plasmoid, since the spark is transparent.  The circuit is correct, so some parameter needs to be adjusted.  Likely the resistance of the cap's output coil.  Having a continuous Plasmoid is important, but this is still a work in progress.