Author Topic: Plasma Power Supply  (Read 1080 times)

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2019, 17:35:10 pm »
The water jar is back on the shelf.  Using it allowed me to characterize the various components and determine that the best combination of coils for the inductor and the output pickup is two MOT primaries.  Testing it with my spherical cell didn't produce any bubbles at all - just some turbulence on the surface - BUT the greater load capacitance had an effect on how far the spark gap arc can be stretched.  And it's even blowing off to the side.  So I'll work with a capacitive load for a while.  If the arc is made to rotate as it jets out, the Lorentz force will cause it to extend, with the ionizing radiation in the spark producing a Self Generating Discharge cascade.  This relates to the dust devil replication project I've been thinking about for quite a while.  (Fifteen years since I drove by that black box road side demonstration). I just needed a continuous jet effect.  Also, a plasma jet is surgical at 273 kH, so each mineral could require a specific frequency, and/or phase composition.  And Tesla pointed out that Human Energy can be Increased by fixating atmospheric nitrogen with 120 kH at 100 kV.  This will help the air breathing hybrid rockets.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2019, 18:21:02 pm by tektrical »

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2019, 05:58:30 am »
The neat thing about my water jar was after I switched over to using two electrode grids, one 3/4" and the other 2 1/4", I could see bubbles everywhere between the grids.  So they were either forming in the water, away from the grids, or they had a charge which spaced them apart at equal distances, even at the bottom of the cell.  Maybe both.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2019, 04:29:10 am »
I've been having a lot of fun with my plasma circuit.  Using a single MOT primary as the inductor I'm getting flame like sparks shooting out from the spark gap.  These finger sparks are even shooting off the electrode itself, about a quarter inch from the gap's arc.  And when this happens it doesn't have any effect on the arc itself.  Which electrode throws the extra sparks depends on the diode polarity.

And I did do some more water cell experiments.  I built another one slightly smaller than half as big as the one I was using, but no bubbles.  I guess I got lucky and the big one had about the right amount of capacitance.  So I decided to make the smaller one into a variable capacitor, by using a C Stack geometry.  (See patent #4,179,627).  I used galvanized mesh for the two grids - which seems to be holding up without corrosion, using well water - and I placed the central electrode in a small water filled plastic tube for insulation.  The second insulated electrode is some more mesh around the outside of the cell.  By the patent, applying a potential to the insulated electrodes increases the amount of energy the water cell itself can hold.  With the cell electrodes hooked to the floating load coil, and the insulated electrodes tied across the spark gap, there were bubbles, although nothing spectacular.  When I went back to the first cell and added the outer grid, the bubble production fell way off.  Too much capacitance.  And I couldn't insulate the central electrode since that cell's all sealed up.

Now I'm going to start doing some advanced experiments with the shooting arc.  And I haven't forgotten that I was once strongly advised by an insider that sometimes certain kinds of tests should be done remotely.

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #19 on: August 20, 2019, 09:05:24 am »
I've been having a lot of fun with my plasma circuit.  Using a single MOT primary as the inductor I'm getting flame like sparks shooting out from the spark gap.  These finger sparks are even shooting off the electrode itself, about a quarter inch from the gap's arc.  And when this happens it doesn't have any effect on the arc itself.  Which electrode throws the extra sparks depends on the diode polarity.

And I did do some more water cell experiments.  I built another one slightly smaller than half as big as the one I was using, but no bubbles.  I guess I got lucky and the big one had about the right amount of capacitance.  So I decided to make the smaller one into a variable capacitor, by using a C Stack geometry.  (See patent #4,179,627).  I used galvanized mesh for the two grids - which seems to be holding up without corrosion, using well water - and I placed the central electrode in a small water filled plastic tube for insulation.  The second insulated electrode is some more mesh around the outside of the cell.  By the patent, applying a potential to the insulated electrodes increases the amount of energy the water cell itself can hold.  With the cell electrodes hooked to the floating load coil, and the insulated electrodes tied across the spark gap, there were bubbles, although nothing spectacular.  When I went back to the first cell and added the outer grid, the bubble production fell way off.  Too much capacitance.  And I couldn't insulate the central electrode since that cell's all sealed up.

Now I'm going to start doing some advanced experiments with the shooting arc.  And I haven't forgotten that I was once strongly advised by an insider that sometimes certain kinds of tests should be done remotely.


The invention is in the field of energy conversion and/or storage and relates to a device which can be variously used as a solar energy converter, capacitor, photoamplifier, a photomultiplier, a synchronizer, a switching device, a photodetector, electromagnetic radiation measuring device, an ion plasma device and a computer memory unit.

Its a multi functional device  :)

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2019, 16:09:51 pm »
The perpendicular spark effect also works with AC.  Without the diode, the yellow arc is more pale and has a higher frequency sound.  The perpendicular sparks come off both electrodes a short distance from the gap.  They look like flower petals popping out in various directions.  This effect isn't anything like the work I've done in the past, pulling the arc itself out to the side.  I'll stay with this project for awhile.  An easily produced radiant energy effect opens up a lot of possibilities.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 16:58:03 pm by tektrical »

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2019, 23:12:15 pm »
it seems you have a lot of fun  ;)

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2019, 23:14:35 pm »
can you measure the type of radiation?
Any x rays involved?

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Re: Plasma Power Supply
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2019, 23:46:39 pm »
I don't see any X-rays with this.  The arc isn't white enough and the voltage is too low.  There probably would be with a similar setup pushing a much higher voltage.  The CEMF in the spark is the key.  But I do feel a lot of UV against my eyes, if I neglect to use my sun glasses.  Tesla recommended a minimum of 15kV, but I think I can make the sparks fly with this.  Otherwise, I'm upping the voltage.  I want that electrically conductive light which instantly dissociates water.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.rexresearch.com/nelsonarticles/rayguns101.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwj1-uvg_57kAhUCOH0KHVSOCdwQFjAAegQIBhAC&usg=AOvVaw23bfzXnEOimTb-xuH0ysgi