Author Topic: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication  (Read 561 times)

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2019, 17:52:25 pm »
I've been snowed under here lately; this time of year, fire wood labor requires way too much of my time.  But I finally took some time to read the Canadian patent, and this isn't what I thought it was.  It CAN be used as a Farnsworth system with a vertical seam and insulating gasket between the two hemispheres, and a loose mesh for the central electrode.  But the patent states that the electrodes maintain the same respective polarities.  So it's a normal Meyer type system.

There is some uncertainty with his usage of the term resonance.  He says the particle velocity increases indefinitely, without periodic gating.  So the resonance frequency must be related to the gating period.  This is shown in the chart as a relative proportion to the voltage.  (Which he said somewhere needs to be at least a kV).  The pulse frequency itself is shown relative to the gating interval.

One issue I have with the patent is the suggestion that the cavity be sized according to a pre-selected resonance value.  I think it would be better to do what Adrian did and build it with available components, then determine the resonance of what we have.

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2019, 08:25:09 am »
The Canadian patent includes the word longitudinal, so Stan appears to have believed these waves were present in his spherical cavity, whether he understood that mechanism or not.  In this day and age, the biggest impediment to understanding these waves is the rubber band analogy in which it is stretched, then relaxed, producing an expansion followed by a compression of the rubber along its length.  What actually happens, according to the old school teachings, is that the rubber band is stretched a certain distance in a specific amount of time, held constant for an equal amount of time, then stretched some more.  There is no relaxing, or recompression in the opposite direction.

From the perspective of the ether, the longitudinal wave has two parts, North Pole and South Pole.  The first half of the wavelength is like a narrow band of ether curling around a line pointing in the direction of travel, while not overlapping on itself, but expanding a little as it travels.  (Like a strip wrapped around a long narrow funnel, getting a little wider along its length).  This is equivalent to a North Pole line of magnetic flux.  At the half wavelength distance the magnetic polarity flips to South Pole polarity.  But this doesn't mean the flux line reverses 180 degrees.  Instead, the South Pole flux tips to the side, 90 degrees to the direction of travel.  This causes the ether to rotate in place, with no travel.  It's like a clock spring, turning in one direction and compressing as it absorbs the ether's North Pole momentum, then expanding as it rotates back in the other direction.  This reaction counter rotation reconstructs a North Pole flux line, extending the longitudinal wave's travel.

An interesting thing about the North Pole curl is that it will accelerate charged particles which are within it.  (This is what cause the extreme, short distance acceleration responsible for producing the solar wind).  Stan presents his device as being capable of Mega Watt gas output, while the patent states that a very small amount of amps are required.  To do that, the device would have to use Longitudinal Waves.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2019, 08:45:18 am by tektrical »

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2019, 18:20:30 pm »
Tesla believed that longitudinal magnetic waves can't exist outside of a vacuum.  In a physical medium, magnetic forces will interact with matter, producing electric fields which convert the waves to electromagnetic energy.  However, he did bounce some kind of longitudinal waves off the moon.  These waves may have been electrostatic or diamagnetic.  Both of these effects require two signals, just as do Tesla's Stationary Waves.  Standing Waves, on the other hand, are composed of a single wave and its reflection.  All of these waves can impart longitudinal movement to a charged particle.  But it's interesting to note that Meyer used TWO epgs to power his dune buggy.  With this apparatus, it's easier to adjust the wavelength to match the distance from the end of the injector to the top of the piston.  (Or the other side of the cylinder).

If a VIC is used with a spherical cavity, determine the wavelength of the VIC's output, then size the cavity to resonate with the available signal.  Or else use some other way to produce the biphasic energy which allows the output to be adjusted to match an existing cavity.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2019, 19:25:43 pm by tektrical »

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2019, 22:41:10 pm »
Farnsworth's diagram shows that the magnetic field tips 90 degrees when the electric field reverses at 180.  My biphasic longitudinal spark illustrates this effect.  (The positive force in this example doesn't regenerate, with further extension, because the negative spikes separate in different directions, lacking overall rotation.)  At 7.5 kV, I'm getting just over one half inch per kiloVolt, although this factor is likely to be different when dealing with water.  For resonance, the length of the positive part of the spark needs to match the distance between the electrode surfaces.  With very little current, a number of pulses would have to be applied to drive the spark's full extension.  (I did see someone else's rapidly rotating negative spark one time, shooting for more than two feet, continuously.)  I was lucky to get the picture I got, with a single pulse from a large capacitor which was barely big enough. 

The patent mentions the electrical polarization process, but this particular system would need reverse bias.  The charged particles are repelled from the positively charged central electrode, rather than elongated in place, so the positive side of the molecules would need to face inwards.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2019, 23:15:11 pm by tektrical »

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2019, 08:13:39 am »
Ive allways wanted to know if the impedance card Stans brother shows in his patent was also included but hidden in Stans circuitry?

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2019, 19:22:01 pm »
Ive allways wanted to know if the impedance card Stans brother shows in his patent was also included but hidden in Stans circuitry?

I'm building a pulse unit which combines the ripple voltage from two capacitors, each with its own diode T-tap circuit.  One cap has an inductive bend, which provides a phase shift.  I got the motor/generator system off of YouTube.  I pulled the gears out of the MW oven turntable motors, then coupled the DC motors directly to the spinning magnets.  With 12VDC to the top motors, the bottom motors put out mains voltage AC.  One DC motor is a little smaller, so its cap's frequency will be slightly lower.  This will produce a beat frequency in the output, something which can accelerate charged particles in a plasma.  The ripple voltage outputs from the caps are combined through a resistor.  With rf, this would need to be a pad.  The output from the resistor will have to be at least a #10 AWG, to avoid adding additional impedance.  And there are, of course, other ways of generating the ripple voltage.  Stan's brother supposedly knew everything he was doing, so there's a good chance Stan was using what Steven shows.

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2019, 04:47:52 am »
Thats nice....are you familiar with envelope detector curcuits and why they are used?
With this spherical cell...the patent plainly says water but  doesn't a gas seem more logical ?
I was pretty sure Samuel Leach had a patent for a similar configuration aided with a laser but I cant find it to post for reference.
Im replying to just be a part of the conversation,I havent built this type cell yet....it looks interesting!

I dont know the significance of the different degrees of pulses in fig 2 of the Canadian patent ....can someone explain that?
« Last Edit: March 02, 2019, 09:03:51 am by Ks »

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2019, 19:36:56 pm »
Thats nice....are you familiar with envelope detector curcuits and why they are used?
With this spherical cell...the patent plainly says water but  doesn't a gas seem more logical ?
I was pretty sure Samuel Leach had a patent for a similar configuration aided with a laser but I cant find it to post for reference.
Im replying to just be a part of the conversation,I havent built this type cell yet....it looks interesting!

I dont know the significance of the different degrees of pulses in fig 2 of the Canadian patent ....can someone explain that?

I haven't heard of the envelope detector circuits, and don't know if I would have the skill to build one.  But they sound interesting, so I'll check into it.  Thanks for the tip.

I think the sprerical cell can be used for either gas or water, but they would have different size resonances due to the differing break down voltages.

The diagram with the increasing pulse intervals represents a type of resonance in which pulses are applied at the begining of each vibration, when the vibrations have increasing amplitude, with longer and longer periods, as opposed to applying a number of pulses, each of which directly increases the magnitude of a single ongoing elongation of the molecules.

And I think eveyone here appriciates your input; you don't have to build something to discuss how it might work.