Author Topic: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication  (Read 556 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4441
    • water structure and science
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2019, 22:24:08 pm »
watch this...


Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2019, 01:54:26 am »
That's a better video than the other one I saw.  The key point is the wavelength in water is about one tenth of what it is in air.

But they still don't understand what's going on.  The effect isn't based on heat - it's caused by standing waves pumping electrons.  The effect doesn't happen unless you do it in a hot spot, where MW's overlap with reflected MW's.  You can get the same sparking with a sharp metal object.  It's the sparking which ignites the grape or toothpick.

Now that we have a relative idea of the resonance in water, how do we define the frequency of varying delay pulses?  Is it still pulses per second?

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2019, 02:43:27 am »
I just checked and the speed of light is about 3/4  of what it is in a vacuum.  (2.25E8). So that's the fraction we need to base our resonance comparison on.  And this also refutes the video's explanation of a sparking grape.

I've done a lot of work with this MW oven sparking effect, and I can get a much bigger plasma ball under a Pyrex cup.  And I do have a 'secret project' which is like an Ace up my sleeve.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2019, 13:53:12 pm »
Standing Waves can also pump positive particles, using the point of a safety pin as the central electrode.   The direction of this movement is perpendicular to the sparking.  Twist the pointed end of the pin out at a 90 degree angle, then put a bend in the other end, to form a triangular base which holds the pointed end straight upwards.  Put it in the MW and the point will turn white from the electron emission produced by the standing waves.  Then the point will start to boil off, with metal particles flying straight outwards.  The sputtering effect is caused by negative ions in the air impacting against the point, which is positive due to loosing the electrons.  Impacts cause the boiling, but not the outwards acceleration.

So I'm wondering how thin a layer of water would have to be to not block this effect?  If the water sputtering does happen, there's a good chance of dissociation upon impact with the ball electrode which forms on the top end of the pin.