Author Topic: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication  (Read 560 times)

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Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« on: February 16, 2019, 19:11:25 pm »
Interest in Stan's WFC seems to be at an all time low lately, but many of us have been and are still working in the shadows!

I post as HMS-776 but lost my email and couldn't reset the password here so I'm posting under my other username.


In Stan's early WFC work he made a Spherical Resonant Cavity to study the phenomenon he called 'Resonant Action'. Patents on the Spherical Resonant Cavity were filed as early as 1982.

About the Spherical Resonant Cavity, Stan stated:

"The motion of the gas atoms will pass out of the opening as though they are jet propelled."

"...the resonant cavity causes the water molecule to travel back and forth continuously and at a velocity that increases geometrically."

It's interesting to note that he stated the velocity increases geometrically... from this statement one can assume this system went into a runaway and the only way of slowing it down and controlling it was to "Gate" the circuit.

"This action continues indefinitely and will continue until the applied energy is terminated."

Reference
-WFC News Release #3
-Europe patent 0,103,656
Canadian patent 1,234,773
-WFC Dealership Sales Manual Chapter 5 'Mega Watt Gas Yield'

 Looking at the dates of the Spherical Resonant Cavity as well as the picture in the WFC News Release # 3 showing his control circuitry we can see he used an autotransformer & his SCR pulsing circuits.

The spherical resonant cavity and its control circuit box is not anywhere in the estate photos?
Who knows where it ended up?

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2019, 09:40:49 am »
Looks good your setup,
The question that rises is what
resonant action between which parts?

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2019, 16:58:03 pm »
Thanks Steve,

IMO there are two resonances that occur within the overall system.
1. Resonance of the circuit
2. Resonance of the cavity

The problem as we all know is getting the first resonance to occur, without it we will not see resonance of the cavity...My question is, what has been holding us back all this time.....Drive circuitry? Choke values and/or balancing? VIC design? My opinion is that in lies with the VIC design, and that if we could get it working and understand how its designed we can solve a lot of other problems.

Time will tell...

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2019, 23:59:09 pm »
Here's a place which sells hollow ss spheres:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://customironworks.com/balls-steelaluminumstainless-c-1/&ved=2ahUKEwjAh_u47MPgAhU3wMQHHSccDdQQFjAUegQIBxAB&usg=AOvVaw1Axhg-Q-a0UqVpcOMM3uwz

A 4" 304ss, with a 1/16" thick shell is $69. Anyone have other ideas?  A sink drain plug has about the right shape for half of it - with holes - but I don't know if you can get ss.  And don't use resteraunt cups, because they do corrode.

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2019, 05:16:50 am »
I bought mine on ebay but you can get them online anywhere... just search 'Stainless bath bomb mold'.
I had to order several before I actually got a 304 SS one... it seems alot of people think aluminum is the same.

You can also get a one piece sphere in a variety of sizes if you search 'stainless garden ball'...

I used the two piece bath bomb since the flange made it easy to mount... also, the garden balls are really thin.

The center sphere is a 304 SS hardened bearing, 1/2" dia.... you have to heat it to red hot then cool it slowly by placing it in sand, after that file a flat on it before drilling.... or if you have a solid carbide bit you could drill it without heating it.

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2019, 08:53:23 am »
This system is different from what Meyer usually worked with.  The resonance diagram shows that the frequency increases with higher voltage.  That means that, in this case, resonance refers to the pulses being timed to match the time of flight of the ions between the two electrodes.  This is a classic example of a Farnsworth type system.  So it's not powered by a VIC transformer.  The positive potential has to alternate back and forth between the two electrodes.  It needs to be fed with a tank circuit comprising a variable capacitor in parallel with a center tapped inductor.  Examples of the wiring diagram can be found in Farnsworth's multipactor patents.

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2019, 03:46:26 am »
The diagram shows voltage amplitude is "held constant"  ???

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Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2019, 19:08:13 pm »
This system doesn't require a step charging waveform.  Once it's fine tuned to establish resonance, both the voltage and the pulse frequency are held constant after that.  Increasing gas output is automatic, without increased potential.  But geometric output does require additional current, so Amp restriction isn't used.