Author Topic: Available High Frequency Supply  (Read 163 times)

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Available High Frequency Supply
« on: January 26, 2019, 15:12:43 pm »
I've been looking at some induction heater builds on YouTube.  These are fairly simple circuits, with a couple of MOSFETs and some caps.  The output is fed to a coil, sometimes with a center tap, and any conductive substance placed inside the coil quickly becomes red hot.  The circuit will typically run at 30 kHz, and I think this can be used for hho production. 

These units are also available at Amazon, pre-assembled, and I picked up a 100W version for $13.  It has two opposite phased outputs, and a center tap.

Anything useful I come up with playing around with this can be scaled up with my 1500W inductive cook top, which is equivalent to a couple of HP.

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Re: Available High Frequency Supply
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2019, 21:47:15 pm »
I think you are talking about zvs drivers.
It is used to drive flyback transformers and this induction heater coils.

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Re: Available High Frequency Supply
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2019, 00:27:57 am »
I've been looking at the fine print on the one I got and it says 50 kHz.  It puts out 600 Vac/1200Vdc.  Five to 12V input.  Similar systems are incorporated into mini Tesla coils.  I need to see if a MW oven diode will work at that frequency.

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Re: Available High Frequency Supply
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2019, 01:33:50 am »
One thing I'm thinking about is converting a candle flame to a plasma, then using the magnetised planar electrode with non magnetic needle point system for extracting electricity.  This comes from an old patent but I saw a recent patent which states this method costs one percent of the price of a comparable fuel cell.

edit:  I've tried this in the past, but my plasma circuit just caused the flame to explode, with a loud bang.  So now I've got an easy test circuit, with a lot less power.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2019, 02:10:31 am by tektrical »

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Re: Available High Frequency Supply
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2019, 18:22:58 pm »
I got my test unit wired up with a spark gap, powered it with 10V, and got a lot of smoke for a second or two.  The board is marked with 5 to 12 V input.  It also smokes without a gap associated with the coil.  I may have a defective unit, so I'll order something else and put the project on hold for a month or so.  The scope shot does show the kind of waveform I think I need.

Later.