Author Topic: My Herman Anderson replication project  (Read 30908 times)

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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #120 on: February 25, 2017, 19:50:58 pm »
From the previous document:

We have observed X-ray production with all four types of detectors described in Section 2.3.
There are three arguments for this statement: (a) the radiation was not affected by a strong magnet
placed between the sparking vessel and the detector, indicating that we are indeed dealing with the
X-rays or neutral particles
; (b) the range measurements are very consistent with the X-ray
production; (c) the response from the gaseous detectors strongly indicates soft X-ray production
(pulses are comparable in size and shape to pulses from an Fe55 X-ray source). The X-rays were
monitored at 90o in respect to the spark axis during all tests in this paper.

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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #121 on: February 25, 2017, 21:35:34 pm »
From the previous document:

We have observed X-ray production with all four types of detectors described in Section 2.3.
There are three arguments for this statement: (a) the radiation was not affected by a strong magnet
placed between the sparking vessel and the detector, indicating that we are indeed dealing with the
X-rays or neutral particles
; (b) the range measurements are very consistent with the X-ray
production; (c) the response from the gaseous detectors strongly indicates soft X-ray production
(pulses are comparable in size and shape to pulses from an Fe55 X-ray source). The X-rays were
monitored at 90o in respect to the spark axis during all tests in this paper.

That's comforting.....  At least we now KNOW that I'm not on the wrong track :) The problem is going to be ,keeping it going... New technology is being  developed everyday... I'm very confident :8) but unlike others.... I am not claiming I have it all figured out !
Just as those working with Stans stuff,without an understanding of what it is you are wanting to do will make it nearly impossible to succeed.You MUST understand WHAT and WHY it is you are wanting to do.
Also as with Stans stuff ,simply replicating the cell and electronics without understanding what and why you are trying to do is hopeless.

BTW .... Its the Stanford study you found most relevant to the x rayss.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 23:52:59 pm by Newguy »

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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #122 on: March 01, 2017, 18:04:27 pm »
Ok. Another update on the project.
I have attached some pictures that maybe make sense for some of you...
You see here the new arrived high voltage unit, similar to the one of Brisby.
Its a 70kV replacement unit for V8 engines. It sparks great is very robust.
I crank the shaft by hand till i found me a small motor to run it.
Its a fantastic piece.
Still have to work out on how to create the needed radiation in combination with the running current thru the cell.
I have some ideas for the next couple of days.

Other components are a radiation meter and emf meter.
The tube is one of the tubes that can also create x rays.
The idea is to create a hole in the cellwall and lower the quartztube in there. Then i can lower the X ray radiating tube in the quartz tube and see what happen..........
And of course i digged up a role of lead metal. I have no intension to be ionized my self.

cheers
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 18:27:49 pm by Steve »

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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #123 on: March 06, 2017, 17:59:05 pm »
Here some videos.
First one is pulsed dc electrolysis at 7.5hz.
In the other videos i try out the HV on the negative.
The switching in these videos is done on the negative as well.

The clicking is a relais and the electromotor you hear is when the HV is activated.


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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #124 on: March 06, 2017, 19:50:23 pm »
Kevin, please have a look at this video...


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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #125 on: March 06, 2017, 20:21:00 pm »
One thing we could imagine some pressure doing would be allowing more mobility....I'd suggest setting it up to work with at least the 8 ounces of pressure and take notes.
Glad you have your cell up and running....be safe...you should try to work with some pressure and maintaining it.

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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #126 on: March 07, 2017, 14:01:35 pm »
One thing we could imagine some pressure doing would be allowing more mobility....I'd suggest setting it up to work with at least the 8 ounces of pressure and take notes.
Glad you have your cell up and running....be safe...you should try to work with some pressure and maintaining it.


Thanks. Will work on the pressure valve asap.
I got a self regulating one, but that one needs a modification for lower pressure of 8 ounces.
Next days i will improve radiation and take some scope shots etc etc....
At least we see some reaction in the water during HV on..

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Re: My Herman Anderson replication project
« Reply #127 on: March 08, 2017, 12:53:27 pm »
I added a pressure valve today and the pressure was somewhere between 8 and 16 ounces.
Did the same test runs.
Nothing improved or changed sofar as i could observe.

Cheers