Author Topic: Magnetic ions  (Read 4222 times)

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Magnetic ions
« on: April 04, 2016, 18:11:12 pm »
this weekend i drop a steel bal into the citric acid solution to try cleaning the rust out of it...
 
it bubbles and the iron got into the solution... turning it red...
 
i than placed a neodymium magnet at the side of the acid tank and the solution after some time was clean, all the iron was on the walls close to the magnet...

this made me wonder...

what would be the result if we had a way to generate a magnetic ion?, than we could use a magnetic field to create an electric potential diference... since we woud not need to apply a potential difference to move the ions. only a magnetic field and as it moves electricity is generated...


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Re: Magnetic ions
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2016, 21:40:06 pm »
It is possible to generate a usable amount of power with ions.  For instance, patent #3,299,299 shows a system which produces 9 MW of power per cubic meter, driven by heat.  However, an on going supply of ions is still needed, in addition to the heat input.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US3299299.pdf

Patent #2,817,776 discloses a method utylizing a magnetic field, but the on going ionization is also needed with this one.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US2817776.pdf

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Re: Magnetic ions
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2016, 04:32:34 am »
i was thinking that maybe if we had something like barium electrode and a magnet.. .

forming a magnetic cell... as the electrode loses atoms to the solution its atoms are atracted to the magnet and the electrons should go thru the circuit ...

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CAUSTIC AND ACID
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2016, 10:25:22 am »
i was thinking about if metals develop a potential in contact with water we could maybe take advantage electrostaticaly from it...

if we place an electrode of stainless steel inside a strong acid i guess it will develop a certain potential ref to ground..

similarly when we place another set of ss plates into a strong basic solution it will develop a certain potential..

due to the how much the atoms wants to stay into the metal or go into the solution..

in my point of view anything connected to this sets will be charged to the same potential...

of course no current can flow if they are isolated systems.. .


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Re: Magnetic ions
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2016, 19:58:05 pm »
what would be the result if we had a way to generate a magnetic ion?, than we could use a magnetic field to create an electric potential diference... since we woud not need to apply a potential difference to move the ions. only a magnetic field and as it moves electricity is generated...

This sounds like an “ion-convection generator.” Prior art devices of this general type have produced extremely high voltages but very low current densities, while the illustrated patent results in lower voltages at useable power levels for loads like motors and lighting.

(http://s20.postimg.org/ohpea7xyl/Ion_Convection_Generator.gif)

The operation is based on the fact that a charged particle approaching an electrode of the same polarity will result in an increase of the potential on that electrode.  The driving kinetic energy is presumed to come from heat although magnetic attraction might also work.  I don't know what the efficiency of such operation would be, since it's designed for high temperature usage.  For best results, the nozzel length is less than 3 mm.

Meyer's EPG particles, with their permanent charge, might be used in a loop, to eliminate the need for constantly producing new ions.

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Re: Magnetic ions
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2016, 02:43:36 am »
Very nice reply Eletroteck thank you for the insight about this patent too...

i think meyer may have took advantage of this too... i believe maybe the liquid have had magnetic particles... or magnetic ions as i´m describing... all dispersed into the solution,..

i was considering a kind of cell that would take advantage of the magnet to make the magnetic ions to be atracted to the electrode while their electrons pass trhu a external load...

i was thinking about having two primary swicting 180degres having the magnetic fields objective directed to flip the direction of the particles movement.. .

in my point of view if the atoms in the solution have unpaired electrons they will be magnetic meaning that it is attracted to a magnet from this we know that the atoms from the second row of the periodic table that have even proton number while get in solution it lose an electron and become magnetic

such as calcium strontium or barium

free electrons also should be atracted to magnets




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Re: Magnetic ions
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2016, 05:33:35 am »
Thanks Fabio.  I'm glad someone else appreciates one of the patents I felt was important enough to download and remember.

Normally, a magnetic field will only deflect a charged particle which is already in motion.  But, your idea of using an ion which is magnetic would allow the magnet to impart the motion.  So, it's actually the magnet's energy which would be responsible for generating the electricity.  If your citric acid/iron solution were circulated in a continuous loop, rather than collecting on the wall of the container, then the initial supply of ions would be adequate for continuing operation.

I think your idea deserves experimentation.  Meyer's EPG, when used in place of the VIC, was a circular loop, with a number of coils.  Perhaps we should try using a single driver coil, with take off electrodes around the loop?  This would appear to offer the possibility of OU operation, if the extracted pulses were short enough.

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Re: Magnetic ions
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2016, 08:07:05 am »
i found that copper can be magnetic in the form of ions in solution, but there may be other stronger in magnetic moment.. like cromium cobalt and iron or manganese

magnetic ions have a distance from each other in solution and they are said to be magnetic diluted because their magnetic field cannot interact much but polarizing it will allow the particles to orient

i guess is possible to spin without moving  the magnetic particles applying ac magnetic fields in the right timing

i dont think anyone tried to dump some chemical inside their tubes in their epg. if an acid was there i guess if its copper the solution will get saturated with copper ions and stop the corosion of the metal

similarly for other metals...

One thing that makes me wonder is that when we actually pulse a coil and it attracts magnets to itself this magnets come in a direction as to consume power from the magnetic field

for ex you apply a north with a coil it will atract the south side of the particles to it... if we could spin they when they reach maximum speed it would enter into the coil inducing a bemf voltage on the coil that could be extractable...

one thing i tried was to make a toroidal coil and put a tiny magnet into it

the result although i thought the magnet would accelerate to max speed in only one direction...hahah Years ago) it get stuck

in a toroid the magnetic field is constant all the way inside.. for a magnet to be accelerated it must be not at the center of the magnet field of the coil other wise it will flip only if small enough to spin