Author Topic: The giant  (Read 6736 times)

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Re: The giant
« Reply #32 on: January 20, 2016, 20:18:18 pm »

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Re: The giant
« Reply #33 on: January 20, 2016, 20:28:20 pm »
yes i use such a circuit... is a halfbridge circuit driver and two capacitors in series connected to the powersupply the connection between them is half voltage of the power supply... mines are ?  ...

if you want to make it fixed impedance maybe you can do it with two power 50 ohms resistors in series to have a half dc voltage there... of course the load would match when would be 50 ohm but this type of circuit will only have a decent effieciency if the load has much higher impedance than the halfbridge resistances. this will dissipate power...

the chip you use will determine the maximum voltage that you can find in the circuit but as you put a diode across each switch there never too much voltage... so a good idea is to use some 400v 60amps mosfets or igbts... the maximum current is calculated by the voltage applied divided by the resistance of the the circuit... if you are using a capacitor you can get dead high currents that will kill the switch and diodes if they are not rated... so if you are using a 60 amps diodes and transistors you must have for 60 v applied at least 1 ohm of resistance for sure in your circuit otherwise the switches die because of the current spike...

puting square wave on a capacitor is not easy as you are imagining

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Re: The giant
« Reply #34 on: January 20, 2016, 20:43:04 pm »
Yeah sure I mean I don't really need a capacitor, just some way to rearrange the charges like electrostatic motors do. For hydrogen I would need a capacitor though.

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Re: Solenoid Choke
« Reply #35 on: January 21, 2016, 18:17:47 pm »
Stan shows the chokes two different ways with his VIC transformer.  One method uses a few solenoid coil type layers, with quite a few turns.  The other is a series of tall narrow coil forms, each having only several turns in each layer.  The goal of the winding style is to output a separate pulse for each layer or coil form.  In order to do this with a solenoid layer choke it needs to be build as a pulse forming network.  The capacitive reactances between the layers must be kept separate.  (This inter layer capacitance is in series with a layer's inductance.)  This separation is accomplished by introducing an extra inductance between the ends of the consecutive layers.  And this is tied up in the winding technique.

After the first layer is laid down, you want to start the next layer at the same end as the first layer.  Otherwise, the outputs will maintain continuity, without breaking up into discrete pulses.  The far end of the wire is brought straight back to the starting side - usually between two strips of dielectric.  The trick is to bow the wire out at about 30 degrees, then put a sharp kink in the wire with your thumbnail, to aim it on back across.  Before the next layer starts, the kinking process is repeated a short distance from the starting end. 

This system adds a half turn inductance between the layers.

Stan specifies that the chokes are wound bi directionally, over and back.  He also said in an interview that he sometimes provided misinformation, to preserve secrecy from his competitors.  A Tesla fan showed me the uni directional winding back in '62, when that group was still close to the source.

Might be worth a try.

the impedance of a small choke to nanosecond pulses is pretty high..

i have build a spiral coil that supose to be able to make nano second pulses... but i got confused about the active and passive line...

i think the passive line formed is what i called in my chokes a resonant layer... where there is a greater impedance since is former a inductance from the layer below below but also a capacitance... thats why i called resonant layer.. in the spiral the capacitance between the two metalic foils is the active line and this have virtually no inductance added.. but the passive line forms an inductance for every turn i guess..

anyone have a better understanding of it?

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Re: Spiral Line Capacitor
« Reply #36 on: January 21, 2016, 23:23:18 pm »
I'm going to order a hundred feet of ribbon cable from DigiKey.  This seems the easiest way to make these, with little confusion about the dielectric thickness.

As I understand it, the outer spiral foil is the active conductor.  This is charged to the inner grounded foil at the starting end.  The switch is also at the starting end.  The outer foil, at the output end, is discharged back to the ground.

Resonance is important when dealing with the layers of a choke.  Capacitance in series with an inductor is also what I use to make my Plasmoid effect.  Therefor, I see a correlation between what I'm doing and Meyer's system.

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Re: The Spiral
« Reply #37 on: January 22, 2016, 00:48:35 am »
I got a 3 meter of 30cm wide foil...

than i cut 5cm 3m x 2 and put the dielectric layers and rolled... i used oil impregnated paper...two layers of kraft and canola oil... than vaccum...

it had around 45 turns...


i will open it and do it with polyester
 

your will be much nicer... this ribon cable is very expensive here thats why i chosed the copper foil raw and paper and kitchen oil.. but i´m thinking that the kitchen oil would make a better job if there was at least a plastic between the papers or no paper at all ...  you cannot imagine how manny hours take to vacuum all the air out of the paper.. the capacitance increase 3 fold.. i stoped vaccum when i saw that the capacitance stoped increasing.. .the capacitance ended up to be 100nf

I´m happy that you will try it too... let me know how is it going...
« Last Edit: January 22, 2016, 01:46:43 am by sebosfato »

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What is a Henrie
« Reply #38 on: January 22, 2016, 02:05:06 am »
I would like to make a post about what is a Henrie...

A value of 1 Henrie inductance really mean that if you apply 1v for 1 second to it assuming it has no resistance at all will charge to 1 amperes..  the time constant gives you also this same result L/R if you  divide L/R both being 1 you get 1 second but this is another thing... this is the time will take for the current to drop to % of its value. it really takes 5 times constants to the current really disapear..

back to the henrie...

if you apply 40kv for 1ns into a 40mh coil should allow the current to go to 1ma...

now comes the interesting part... the inductance changes when you add a core,,

but how does a core work?

why we say it saturates..

actually the core material under no applied field has its maximum permeability... when we apply a pulse the core start to decrease this permeability to the point where in saturation is minimal...

the number of turns needed to be able to apply such a voltage on a coil if the coil on a core must be thought because otherwise the core would saturate way before you need without you perceiving it

so is necessary to calculate the maximum webber and  find the turns that would be required by that route..

basicaly minimum turns will be the applied voltage * pulsetime /area/bmax

for example my cores has 1 square inch and that is 6,45E-4 m2 = 0,0254m*0,0254m  =0,000645m2

so for this voltage using this core like this and this time 1ns i would need only less than 1 turns..

not really sure if the core would even respond in such fast time..

the permeability should need be realy big to provide such inductance with only one turn of wire...


« Last Edit: January 22, 2016, 02:29:57 am by sebosfato »

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Re: The giant
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2016, 04:22:47 am »
what if we are looking at the chokes in the wrong way?

have you tried to think the definition of choke is something that filters ac out not allowing it to go to a dc source...

basically an impedance...

well my theory tells me that all is needed is to get water to charge up in dc but to be depolarized breaking the covalent bonding...

if we get a steady current thru a coil there is energy accumulated into it

this energy is proportinal to the current squared and the inductance linearly..

in short words the shorter the coil the greater will be the amps and so the energy..

now how do we can make this energy to be useful?

i was imagining that if we would send a positive pulse to this system on the capacitor side than the choke would fell an impedance change in the load as its receiving current from the pulse... than the coil will be forced to colapse helping coherently the applied pulse...

energy is equivalent to magnetic field.... humm

what if we insert electric field to interact with this magnetic field?

the fracture cell and all this nanopulse stuf is making me think a lot... the horvath and all others stat making sense...

its all parts of the same thing.

if i could get lot of money i would get some power spark gaps and high voltage capacitors, vacumm diodes... so far i´m planing using oil spark gap and building my own high voltage capacitors.. not an easy or cheap task.. but i´m going for it...