Author Topic: *The resonance method of determining the dielectric constant*  (Read 1746 times)

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*The resonance method of determining the dielectric constant*
« on: October 28, 2015, 00:01:40 am »
Can it be the explanation for "tuned into dielectric constant of water" claim?

Searching about dielectric constant measurements and definition i found this article:

"The resonance method of determining the dielectric constant of a specimen (A4 Paper) "

It is valid for a lot of dielectric elements such as WATER.

http://www.actasatech.com/index.php?q=journal.view.89

Please click "download article" to read.

There is a lot stuff near to the meyer setup (LC oscilator etc.)

Maybe is nothing new but, please, take a look! :-)

Thanks in advance.


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Re: *The resonance method of determining the dielectric constant*
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2015, 08:05:57 am »
very nice! looking into it..

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Re: *The resonance method of determining the dielectric constant*
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2015, 12:37:13 pm »
Another interesting question:

According to the Tony Woodside measurements of the mechanical dimensions of the cell tubes,
I calculated the surface area of the inner tube (aprox 4.319In^2)

http://www.calculatorsoup.com/calculators/geometry-solids/cylinder.php

Then, a capacitor based on dielectric constant of water (78.54) and the space between the tubes (0.0950") with this tool:
http://www.daycounter.com/Calculators/Plate-Capacitor-Calculator.phtml

It results in aprox. 802.688pf


Finally use this one to obtain the frequency:
http://www.calctool.org/CALC/eng/electronics/RLC_circuit

Get the coil chokes value and calculate...

What Stan said in the patent of the VIC about the resonance lock in?
802.688pf with positive charging choke with 1262.7mH gives what??

4999.16HZ almost 5khz, right?

Next week i will buy a good LCR Meter and perform some tests.