Author Topic: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers  (Read 17754 times)

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2008, 09:56:44 am »
There are apparently many articles on this gas gun, in Memo WFC 420.
Figure 1-17 shows 16 I.R. LED's on each side.
And probably more memo's will show something similar.
It does say in several instances that this laser energy helps to displace the electrons in the gas.
I understand photons are able to move electrons from metal surfaces from reading the Wikipedia definition.
Meyer states the laser primed gas and speaks of the electron movement, displacement and then removal or extraction circuit.
In the Figure 1-17 of memo WFC 420 notice that the leds are pointed or facing the negative voltage zone plate or tube.
I am also thinking that many electrons are forced or helped out of the electrode in the center from the laser injection and hopefully
the liberated gas atoms.
He also does say the gas's are quite displaced that they do not want to stablize back to water.

Many of this group are writing of  trying U.V. bands of laser or led and no one has touched on I.R. from the Meyer documents.
I was just going to try any Laser wavelength but now am having second thoughts.
Why did Meyer choose 935nm?

Sorry for the jibbering but I would really like to see or read something positive from this process.
 

Komtek,

Question: where did you read the 935nm frequency?

br
Steve

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2008, 20:04:19 pm »
apparently there are different types of infrared so maybe he was just stating an average but infrared does fall into a tiny range of light frequencies...either way pulsing the i.r. lights would cover this spectrum.

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2008, 22:10:57 pm »
Stevie, I have read some of the same memo's on Meyer, maybe printed in different years.
My friend brought a group of them over.
After looking at his I noticed some difference in pictures, made me wonder.
I came to a conclusion, Meyers process's were updated with time.
His memo's were updated also, there are changes.
This Memo opens copyright 1995 and after intro and index  and a couple pages starts:
Hydrogen Fracturing Process (method)  WFC 420 I believe more than one time refers to I.R. Led's
one instance on page 1-8 typical 20ma per diode, 1.7v for red emitters
on off pulse frequency 1-65hz and above.  This is in section 1 and notice his use of a rotor to allow
laser flow into the chamber on/off/on/off etc... figure 1-13.
Right into section 3 Memo WFC 422 DA second page or first description of "Laser Accelerator Assembly"
7th line down (935nm) and refers to a 100khz frequency.
I also believe this to be just a wavelength in I.R. (935) that he may have started with and that we should as a group
try different wave lengths in I.R. and others.
In this section 3 WFC 422 DA his laser housings that were stackable, the lasers used 4 lenses (lenses could be doped although he did not say).
I think he was focusing the beam to a fine point or maybe the opposite for spread. I don't have that figured out. Whats concentric mean again?
In the earlier document the picture or figure did show the light pattern bouncing or reflecting in the housing.
I'm working on some sort of laser injection and have too many ideas to start with so I'm trying to get focused.
Sometimes thats the hard part.
I have Green 532nm or so at 25mw and its intense. 2 diodes of 410nm or close and 1 small diode of 635nm.
One of my thoughts needing some input is the use of optic cable. Is there any loss of strength lets say with
several 3 foot pieces of optic cable.
I wanted to try the optic cable first before I make a mount for the laser and light cavity to get to a isolated pair of
tubes.
Red 635 and 632nm are very common and cheap, I'm hoping these will work.
Green 532 is very common also.

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2008, 05:37:43 am »
http://parts.digikey.com/1/parts/946296-diode-ir-emitting-gaas-46-se5455-003.html

this is the LED mentionned in the patents , Galium-Arsenide 935 nm

you seem to be confused with the use of the laser , The laser is used to up the orbit of the electrons of oxygen to make sure they get  all plucked out  at the end , it helped the electron extraction circuit allowing 100% success rate in plucking out the electrons thats it.

you could pluck out the electrons using raw voltage only but you could combine lesser voltage with photon energy of right wavelenght meanwhile to aid the electron extraction .

Because he was able to pluck out the electrons using voltage only w/o lasers, the taper resonant cavity did that , but he also had another design of the same taper injector using a laser right in the middle of the center electrode to help the electron extraction process .


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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2008, 09:51:30 am »
Hi,


We have to energize the hydrogen.
I dont know if we have to energize the oxygen as well.
If you want the frequencys for this energizing, then go read
http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,407.0.html
Look at that picture of the Bohr model.
Its all in there.
Good luck!

br
Steve

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2008, 23:38:37 pm »
Nice find Dankie! I'm going to try 10 of these from DigiKey.

Thanks for the input to read about the Bohr model.
It seems reading is the only way to get some research done before the build and try.
I read deeper into the Meyer memos and found he even mentioned UV at 350nm.
That was the last laser step he stated.
It seems Stan used more than 1 laser in the process and extraction circuit.
That was a good way to keep the gas's unstable.
I also will agree that the oxygen gas is taking a hit with photons doing the same process and
electrons are being shifted in its shell.
Even with this process to higher state energy (hydroxy) at the end a mixture of outside air (gas) is still needed to
aid in the burn rate.
Stan stated with his measurement device that natural gas burned at a rate of 47cps and the hydroxy at 325 cps
meaning that he had to adjust the ratio of hydroxy burn with even more outside air supply.
There also was a flame chamber used to heat the gases. Even mentioned steam. Many processes he covered.
Now another point I'm not clear on but he writes about the laser injection with a variable voltage and variable
frequency that seem to be in an automated state finding the best resonant activity.
Most of his electronics seemed to have some locking into resonant action ability like (can I say) a automatic
tuner circuit used for Ham Radio application maybe.
So I'll give it a go anyway with no real numeric caculation but adjustable system parameters until I can find
a positive outcome. Then put some numbers into that with voltage, frequency, wavelength, tempurature, etc...
I'm guessing like Hydro did with a torch or flame, this should be able to tell you a visual picture of the burn. 

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2008, 07:51:24 am »
yeah well it sounds a bit dangerous , were are not talking about HHO here tahst 2.5 times more powerful than gasoline , we are entering the realm of the gallon of water = to a 10000000 barrels of oil
 
i wouldnt  try any of this , this is pure-energy he mentionned

i wont try photons till after i exhaust them , thats it , dont use this for pre-ignition

make sure if you remake my coil that its not in a vacuum or motor first ,

make sure you got some ionized gases so those unstable atoms can link to something lol

i am not a chemist pr physicist , you should seriously got to your towns university or college and ask some 1 for this , like i said i wouldnt try this PRE-ignition without being sure its 100% safe

stick to voltage only , i dont know what would happen if the atoms cant link up , you might have a motor blow up in your face

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2008, 08:18:17 am »
dankie

I agree there are risks in this, But the rewards can be overwhelming.
The thing is, One has to go about it safely, and in a sensible manner.
And definitely don't do anything you are not comfortable with.

Spike