Author Topic: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers  (Read 17753 times)

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2008, 02:54:13 am »
The led's are ordered.
I'm going to work on some information on the optoschmitt circuit or some other way to turn them on
and off.
The memo on Meyers circuit states the optoschmitts were going in a ramp state on/off sequence.
Other memos all seem to have a on/off state even with a rotor arm or rotor plate.
There should be a logic circuit easily obtainable to make a sequencial on/off ramp of the laser circuit.
I'm thinking there will be trouble in the electrodes (too much energy) if you do not turn these led's on/off.
I feel this should be safe with control of the on/off that is adjustable.

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2008, 16:05:05 pm »
Saw over at energetic forum on laser ignition:

http://www.iitk.ac.in/reach/2008/Energy/LaserFiredICEngine-Dhananjay/Reach%20Symposium_Dhananjay.ppt

About 1.5 meg ppt download.

IndianaBoys

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2008, 18:33:42 pm »
Does it occur that you have unstable H and O atoms seeking electrons, therefor the liberated atoms now are seeking electrons in which only now "other atoms are willing to share that would not share beforehand."

Also to dislodge the electrons it will happen very early in the process so early you may miss it. The cell must oscillate with the power source and you must prove the resonate cavity is in resonance with the power source. If the cell was oscillating with the power source would this mean the cell was in return running the power source, or would this mean the power source was running the resonate cavity, or would this mean the both was in resonance together,, would this mean an electron would have gotton dislodged, jamed, consumed somewhere? I suggest Looking deeper into your setups for this extraction, its rare and i only know of 1 setup that accomplishes it. It's possible the cell at resonance,, well its a fact the cell at resonance will take a load from the power source at oscillation/resonance decreasing the amount of energy needed to run the cell. So not only does the resonate cavity prove to produce more gas than it should but it also proves to help out in the process.

Just a Thought.

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2008, 19:50:39 pm »
It says in the technical brief  the "lasers" (LED's) are pulsed .  In the patents (don't remember which ones) he says the electron extraction happens during the off time of the pulse and is used up in a resistive wire.  I say B.S.  He didn't waste that electricity, I think that what was powering the LED's.

I'm pretty sure in one of the videos he talks about pulsing the laser during the off time of the VIC.

Here are some good links about photo dissociation.  http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/physical_science/chemistry/photodissoc_h2o.html&edu=high

http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys301/lectures/spec_lines/Atoms_Nav.swf

Mike

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2008, 03:41:54 am »
Mike,

I'm not sure if it will help or not, but here's a pulsing circuit that has adjustable frequency and also has sequential outputs.
http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,342.0.html
Maybe you could customize it to pulse your lasers (LED's) sequentially.  ???

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2008, 14:10:22 pm »
Mike,

I'm not sure if it will help or not, but here's a pulsing circuit that has adjustable frequency and also has sequential outputs.
http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,342.0.html
Maybe you could customize it to pulse your lasers (LED's) sequentially.  ???

Thanks,Tommy I may use that.  Present testing is with a pulse generator, but it can't do a pulse train on its own without an external trigger so this would help.

I think sequentially turning on the LEDs is what Meyers was doing also.  I believe he said that in one of the videos.
 
Mike

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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2011, 03:25:42 am »
while googling IR and h20, came the words:

water vapour absorption window (926.0969.7 nm)

maybe thats why stan chose IR led's?

on an italian forum, i read:

 "Pulsed potential impacts on the polarized, aligned water molecules not only extend electronsphere ITS, ITS raising quantum state, But Also Affect the photoelectron yield of the water, in effect rendering it more susceptible to photodissociation Than it is in a normal ground state.
With photon emission occuring from Oxygen upon liberation, the quantum efficiency of photolysis becomes greater than one, with each dissociated water molecule triggering the dissociation of others.
The peak absorption point of this photosensitivity is Believed to be in the Infrared, around 900nm, Which does not correspond with That of normal water, Which Is in the UV portion of the spectrum."



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Re: Stan Meyer's hydrogen fracturing process using Lasers
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2011, 08:46:26 am »
I also read in some papers that the absorption of water at 1,7um is the maximum. Laser energy is vibrational energy. This frequency induces a vibration in the molecule. Depending on the frequency you have a kind of movement of the atoms. I will try to find here the link. It have much to do with the water blue color and bands of absorption.

If i could buy some lasers i would go for all those fundamental vibration modes. But there are many combination of vibrational modes too. I think tha the symmetrical stretch is the one.


http://www.btinternet.com/~martin.chaplin/vibrat.html

http://chemistry.ncssm.edu/watervibCS.pdf


http://www.atmos.albany.edu/daes/atmclasses/atm422/vib1.htm