Author Topic: Injector Project  (Read 8459 times)

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Injector Project
« on: September 03, 2015, 19:11:11 pm »
Here's a picture showing my Injector development.  The one made with shipping tape eventually melted and carbonized, burning out.  The new one is made with high temperature muffler tape.  In the past, I've gotten a large red fireball, from a few drops of drinking water, simply by placing a ring magnet on top of the basic cube element before firing my Plasmoid circuit.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2015, 19:14:24 pm »
Here's a snap shot showing some lightning bolts thrown out of the Plasmoid projector.  This is on a millisecond time scale, so I had to make a number of videos to capture the image.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2015, 20:19:59 pm »
My inexpensive Cube can be expanded, with one or more additional chambers, so that water can be used as the ONLY source of fuel.  This is what MEYER claimed for his system, water only.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2016, 04:51:24 am by electrotek »

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2015, 20:32:12 pm »
hope to see it working

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2015, 14:48:36 pm »
Here's a snap shot of the ion plume produced by my Injector Cube.  (This is with no water added.)

(http://s20.postimg.org/ua42e84ml/frame2012.jpg)

This is simpler, and cheaper, than Meyer's original hardware.  This doesn't require an external source of ions.  Or his related compressed air supply - tank or engine mounted pump.  When water is added, the voltage gradient produced across the capacitive plates embedded in the cube will pump the vapor, acting as a mini particle accelerator.  (I've verified this part of it.)  No compressed air needed here either.  Also, each embedded plate has a different momentary potential.  Therefor, the water molecules are subjected to a changing stress field as they quickly move past each plate in sequence.  And, the edges of the plates don't have to actually touch the water for the voltage gradient to affect it.  Therefor, there's minimal electrical current flow through the water, in the form of a leakage current only.

My next version will be designed to have a broad spectrum resonance.  But I still plan to add an ignition suppressing 'quenching circuit' plate to this one, for further testing prior to including the bubbler.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 15:10:36 pm by electrotek »

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Bag of Caps
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2016, 04:59:09 am »
I got a good price on a bag of 100 capacitors from Electronic Goldmine.  These are 2 MFD each, rated at 275 VAC.  The thing is, I've learned in the past that the DC rating of a cap is much higher than its AC rating.  So I hooked one up to my MOT, with a string of diodes, and it's holding.  I've got the transformer current limited with two 100 Watt light bulbs wired in series with the primary, with the bulbs themselves wired in parallel.  This enables me to power the setup with a small battery driven inverter.

This one little capacitor holds twice the power of a normal MW Oven cap (when powered by the MW transformer), but all of these caps together won't hold the same Joules as my 16 MFD 7.5 kV defibrillator cap.  However, I've made the decision to run some tests of my gradient plate Injector Cube at a lower power level.  And I'm going to see what my Firestorm spark plug replica does with my Plasmoid circuit.

I've also got a side project using caps to produce Meyer's step charging waveform - powered by the MOT.  I put four caps in series, hit them with a pulse, then took a reading across one of them and got 400 Volts.  So the MOT's output is in the 500 to 2,000 Volt range Meyer specifies in one of his patents.  I also found a patent which has a circuit to extract the ripple voltage from the cap.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2016, 06:10:40 am »
you could make a giant bank...

good to see you are on the mots.... =) good luck

post some more about it...


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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2016, 08:47:01 am »
Dont kill yourself....