Author Topic: The Right Question?  (Read 28403 times)

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2015, 20:29:29 pm »
was reading Bill Beaty info last night about "static electricity"  which you may find interesting .


http://amasci.com/static/what_is_static.html

http://www.amasci.com/emotor/stmiscon.html

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2015, 22:27:40 pm »
yes good links i saw it before... thanks for pointing for all...

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2015, 05:09:57 am »

Q : what would happen if you had a glass 1/2 full of water and a glass 1/2 full of electrons , then you poured 1 glass into the other ?

remembering water is self ionizing all the while......

purely theoretical and obviously out side of electrolysis

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2015, 14:56:18 pm »
water won't accept any electrons... so they will just be there polarizing the molecules... its not going to equal distribute like ions would in my point of view... maybe some will compensate and create free positive ions there too... not sure

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2015, 15:43:37 pm »
what happens if you charge the inner electrode to 1000v and than charge the outer electrode to 1000v?

would the frequency double from the reference across the electrodes?

the teory says that the potentials will sum so the potential of the outer electrode influentiate the potential of the inner electrode too...

if we charged the inner electrode 1000v and it created for example 100v potential diference across the electrodes than we charge the outer electrode the inner electrode will be at 1100v since there was already 100v but actuallly it should be higher...

what if we use a coil with open end?

ronie said to us that he re-discovered it by accident right?

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2015, 16:19:27 pm »
what exactly and where did Ron said that?

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2015, 00:01:39 am »
somewhere a year ago he said he put it to work than after he burned his coils he never got it to work again,,,

somehow also from what i understood the resonance of the wires when open end it causes a reflection of that wave toward the source.. it will happen for a termination of higher impedance than the impedance of the choke... if it was shorted the wave also reflects but it does like an inductor does.. with reversed polarity... a pulse of reverse polarity would make the voltage zone to decrease its magnitude... even if it comes at the other electrode...is that correct?

I have a really good news...

i thought my 40kv probe was burned... it kind of don't show 40Mohm as before.(it never did i confused).. ... the new differential probe has 40Moms between inputs and 20Mohm between inputs and ground.. this 40kv probe has 1000Mohm resistance... its output impedance is 1,1Mohm that when in parallel with the resistance of a 10Mohm input dmm makes exact 1Mohm... so the total resistance is 1GOhm

the only reading of resistance i have at the 1000:1 40kv probe is 1,1Mohm across the leads that should go to the multimeter..

i was planing to use this probe to monitor the voltage potential of the cell while the other probe would be connected across the cell to get the potential diference.

the nicer thing about it is that i just discovered i can connect it to a oscilloscope too but the division would be 2000 instead of 1000...

the problem is it would need some compensation to get the right wave form.. my model is the tt hvp40 from testec like this on farnel anyone has ideas of how to make a compensation ckt for it?

thats because the oscilloscope has 1Mohm input impedance and together with the 1,1Mohm output impedance of the probe makes the impedance around 580k so it won't be 1000 to 1 anymore... im thinking to make a bnc connector with a trimpot to fine adjust the probe voltage reading...
« Last Edit: November 30, 2015, 02:39:56 am by sebosfato »

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2015, 01:10:42 am »
i was just thinking about if i need any compensation i would use a regular oscilloscope probe connecting the 1000/1 probe... actually it will become a 2000 /1 probe when connected to the oscilloscope... i have tested and its very precise at 200v or so... its going to be good working with both probes at same time so i can monitor that the new probe won't pass its rating during testing...


i have thought a lot about how the probe works before starting put it to work  so i can understand it well its effects and its limitations...

i found that this 20Mohm resistance from each input to ground will somehow polarize the results in a certain way so i must include it now in the circuit i´m analyzing to see its effects on it...

the other probe has 1000Mohms so its impedance is very high to cause to much interference...