Author Topic: How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!  (Read 34361 times)

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #72 on: March 15, 2015, 11:32:46 am »
I think the coils have only two possibilities... adding or subtracting... this give you a broad range of frequencies to play with...

of oourse adjusting the core we change the coeficient of inductance and resistance of the circuit....

how much gas do you get with this 8ma? here with up to 20ma i can't see anything... where are you reading this 8ma and how? what kind of meter?

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #73 on: March 15, 2015, 17:16:37 pm »
It's only a small steady steam.  It's also appearing on the connection points so I know it is still normal electrolysis.  I have a small analog ammeter inline with the cell that measures from 0 to 50mA.

Incidentally, using distilled water.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2015, 01:23:10 am by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #74 on: March 15, 2015, 17:27:56 pm »
Here's another perspective on the fields on the coils that has recently occurred to me; related to my post here:
http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,2946.msg27337.html#msg27337
Quote
First off, let's look at the initial pulse on the primary core.  It will create a field on the core creating a potential difference across the L2 coil.   Now the one thing that they are not seeing is that this also creates a voltage potential across the L1 and secondary coils (which are in series) also at the same time since they are in parallel with L1.  This means that the voltage created on L2  will develop a field on the secondary core (which have L1 and the secondary connected in series) at the same time as L2 purely because of the voltage potential developing across L2.

The secondary and L1 coils on the secondary core behave almost like a transistor.  Once the voltage from the L2 on the primary core energizes and creates a voltage potential across the secondary/L1 the current from the collapsing primary core can now flow through these coils in the direction that the diode will allow.  This is because the field already exists from the applied voltage and the current is no longer needed to create the field.  BUT on the off pulse on L2, the field on the secondary core will be reluctant to collapse because of the way the coils are wired which opposes the fields collapse.  As such, the next voltage pulse from L2 only increases the field on the secondary core, maintaining a constant increasing step up voltage on this side of the WFC.

This is just a theoretical way to look at this.  I don't know for sure if it works this way.

However, the amount of current that will be able to flow through the secondary/L1 coils is dependent on 3 things:
1. The winding ratio between the 2 coils
2. The amount of current induced on the primary core.
3.  Any other resistance in the VIC that will restrict the current

Equation to solve for mutual inductance is LT = L1 + L2 ± 2M
« Last Edit: March 17, 2015, 00:02:51 am by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #75 on: March 16, 2015, 02:18:33 am »
when a coil start to become a trasmission line?

today ran many tests on my vic primary... i took away the diode across it..

when i add the L2 coil to the core open circuited its self resonance is 30khz if only half core is present (totally insert) or if the gap is superior to 16mm and goes down to 15khz with both halfs of the cores inserted...

when resonance is found a peak in current is observed 20ma or so more.. while the current remain 50ma for all freq range above 500hz ... very linear...

from what i could grasp from tl theory in that diagram the coils opposing each other connected serially acts as a shorted stub... so create a resonance freq by itself,,,

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #76 on: March 16, 2015, 03:01:22 am »
from  what i could grasp from tl theory in that diagram the coils opposing each other connected serially acts as a shorted stub... so create a resonance freq by itself,,,
Use an inductance meter to measure the coils in series opposing each other and see what you get.  Then measure them separately and then with all the coils.  Remove the diode or you won't get a proper reading.

Then calculate your resonant frequency and your cap value to get the calculated inductance at resonance.   See if it matches any of your measured values.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2015, 04:27:31 am by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #77 on: March 16, 2015, 09:20:51 am »
ts meyer says the water is a resistor for the vic... not necessarily must be at resonance...

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #78 on: March 16, 2015, 10:50:26 am »
ts meyer says the water is a resistor for the vic... not necessarily must be at resonance...

Meyers does refer to the WFC as a cap and does refer to resistance is at its highest at resonance and the VIC as an RLC circuit.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #79 on: March 16, 2015, 10:58:55 am »
ts meyer says the water is a resistor for the vic... not necessarily must be at resonance...

Meyers does refer to the WFC as a cap and does refer to resistance is at its highest at resonance and the VIC as an RLC circuit.

he also say say that the wiper arm fine tunes to the dielectric proprieties of water,, i think by that makes reference to adjusting the impedance... the lower the resistance the lower will be the voltage due to current on the cell.... however as high voltages are present i'm presuming the cells will have high voltage across it as a consequence of that . but not only that ...

i think the resonant cavity determine the base wavelength the system must resonate and thereafter the chokes and coils must be arranged to match such operation...

what i mean is that the resonant frequency is not a simple value... it has some basic factors that determines its frequency but i guess we are far from an equation or something like that. i'm reading on some books and on the books its written that this is a kind of art to create this kind of lines with coils...