Author Topic: How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!  (Read 34358 times)

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2015, 23:19:16 pm »
Water being polar can absorb radiant energy to increase the capacitor gap increasing voltage which in theory if is large enough you can use to increase the voltage really high , it would explain why conditioning the tubes gets you better results except the larger surface area which would also increase current. The electrolyte solution is the ground in this case. Pure water is the dielectric , the electrodes are Metal+ | negative ions and positive ions| Metal- . This double layer effect happens with all electrolysis cells but water and other solvents can rearrange themselves given the circumstances and the electrode surface you can try nafion or to condition your tubes you can try for yourself get a camera with zoom and a container with a window  put dye in ionized water and measure the formed gap. I haven't tested it yet.

"Conditioning the tubes" increases their capacitance because the oxides end up having a higher dielectric value than water. It also screws up your resonance values and impedances.  If this was what Meyers intended I'm pretty sure he would have made mention of it in his patent. I'm quite certain this isn't right.  There should be no electrolyte in a Meyers cell.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #49 on: March 09, 2015, 00:28:13 am »
I will again emphasize that the tuning of the gate pulse is of huge importance in getting the step charge effect on the WFC to work.  If not tuned correctly it can appear as a flat pulse or a descending charge instead of ascending.  When the gate is set properly, the resonance charge should apply voltages in the hundreds or even thousands of volts against the WFC as a step charge.

It seems that the slower the gate pulse, the higher the potential charges and step up hitting the cell.

Also, the higher the resistance that appears across the cell, the higher the charge on the cell will become.  I am simulating with values across the cell ranging between 1k to 10k.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #50 on: March 09, 2015, 00:47:26 am »
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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #51 on: March 09, 2015, 01:06:24 am »
Ok maybe youre right will have to make some experiments.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #52 on: March 09, 2015, 12:51:16 pm »
Meyer said that Stainless steel is chosen to keep out the chemical reaction so the lower is the area of the electrode the lower is the capacitance and so lower the chemical reaction (current)....

before experimenting you should know what you are doing.... the voltages to be reached are going to kill yourself if proper care is not taken.

If you don't know what you are doing, and just try to copy stan or others, the chance to discover it may be 1 in one trillion... of course coincidences can happen....

The main problem is that we fell lost not knowing what should happen inside the cell... Than the lack of physics and electrical engineering basic fundamentals also won't help and cause an even greater confusion....

I can help you saying coils are coils capacitors are capacitors.... potential is potential.... potential difference is another thing....

I think i figured the meaning of voltage bounce effect or electron bounce... Its the ability of the charging choke to balance the potential being applied sometimes making the potential jump from one value to another... basically meyer named it this way because the current on one end of the coil become different than on the other... so it just bounce the potential to somewhere else in the ckt ... (thats related to the capacitance charging effect)

the electron inhibiting effect is accomplished with the other coil being in series...



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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #53 on: March 09, 2015, 14:33:26 pm »
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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #54 on: March 09, 2015, 14:51:40 pm »
There are so many things going on in the VIC despite there only being a handful components to it.  I am still coming to recognize new actions in it.  I am going to try to make a slideshow showing each component.  But here is what I know so far.

1.  Normally a transformer transforms power according to its winding ratio.  But the other physical properties of coils cannot be ignored and they also apply to transformers.

2.  Assuming point 1, we know we are trying to limit current in the VIC.

3.  Also assuming point 1, we know we are trying to achieve a high voltage on the VIC.

4.  Assuming point 2, two coils in the VIC can be set up to oppose each other to halt main current flow in the VIC.  This will not completely stop current flow with other components but definitely slow it down.

5.  Assuming point 4, since current flow is near possible due to restriction in point 4, applying a step up voltage on a transformer to the VIC, such as 5kHz will not do anything to the restricted current flow.  Each pulse will just add to the magnetic field on the transformer core and leak some current out with each pulse since the current is being maintained due to what we know about coils in point 1.  This will appear on a scope as a stepped up current, not stepped up voltage, at this stage.  We are assuming the gate pulse has not been applied yet.

6.  Assuming point 1, we know that when the applied voltage on the primary side of the transformer is stopped that the coil is going to want to induce a voltage high enough to continue current flow and we can calculate the required induced voltage to do this.  Due to current restriction and high impedance on the secondary circuit it will be very high, in the range of thousands of volts.  Since the coil that is coupled to the primary has higher windings, it will experience an exponential step up and could be in the hundreds of thousands of volts depending on the resistance it must overcome from what we know in point 4.

7.  Since we know point 6, we can assume that if we kept turning point 5 on and off we can repeat step 6 over and over again.  In essence, the gate pulse.

8.  If we tune step 7 correctly, we can then get a step up charge on a specific component that has been placed in the secondary circuit, such as the WFC.

9.  If step 8 has a resistance value, the amount of charge that can be measured will be lower relative to the value of the resistance.  How high that value is is also dependant on how well the coils are tuned and gating of point 6 is tuned. However, this doesn't change the fact that step 8 is still being hit by potentially hundreds of thousands of volts.

10.  Now, what if we got step 7 going as a second resonant frequency?
« Last Edit: March 10, 2015, 05:04:49 am by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #55 on: March 09, 2015, 15:04:08 pm »
Post to mark becoming a Sr. Member.   Woohoo!
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