Author Topic: How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!  (Read 34360 times)

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #32 on: March 03, 2015, 19:13:02 pm »
In that case it seemed like if the diode within the coils act as a voltage multiplier of some kind... thats what i mean...

In that case the was a toroidal transformer having a primary a secondary and a choke having 30turns connecting the secondary to the choke thru a diode would result in high voltage output... if the diode goes in the end not!

Iit seem like the coils capacitance were charged and the collapse than adds up the voltages together... i was just mentioning

Still sounds like a DC resonant charging circuit.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2015, 22:54:19 pm »
probably it was i'm just saying it was strange...


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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #34 on: March 04, 2015, 12:33:29 pm »
 was thinking and maybe was a good idea to use the diode after the choke and probably even better to have two diodes one at each side to prevent the capacitor from discharging to the choke

I think the diode makes a selective port for the reflections occurring...


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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #35 on: March 04, 2015, 15:19:37 pm »
Dual core VIC simulation.

I get a 100kV charge on the "WFC" in about 40 seconds.  Current stays in the uA range.

Positioning of the resistor is probably wrong. With the resistor across both caps the voltage charge remains under 10 volts.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2015, 19:41:24 pm by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #36 on: March 04, 2015, 19:47:41 pm »
your simulation is far from reality

the resistance of water can be only a couple of kilo ohms

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #37 on: March 05, 2015, 01:11:52 am »
your simulation is far from reality

the resistance of water can be only a couple of kilo ohms

Only?  A couple kilo ohms would be better compared to what I have.  135<1k ohm.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #38 on: March 05, 2015, 11:07:43 am »
there are filters that you can use to deionise the water... do you have a ppm meter?

well actually the resistance of the water should not change things much because as per stan words if you restrict the amps and use the voltage potential to do the work the water will get charged !

May i ask you a question? If you get a charged conducting sphere that you connected to a source of 1kv positive relative to ground, what is the electric field right next to the sphere? what is the electric field 1m away? what if the dielectric was water?

Now imagine its a hollow sphere, what is the electric field inside?

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #39 on: March 05, 2015, 13:57:56 pm »
there are filters that you can use to deionise the water... do you have a ppm meter?

well actually the resistance of the water should not change things much because as per stan words if you restrict the amps and use the voltage potential to do the work the water will get charged !

May i ask you a question? If you get a charged conducting sphere that you connected to a source of 1kv positive relative to ground, what is the electric field right next to the sphere? what is the electric field 1m away? what if the dielectric was water?

Now imagine its a hollow sphere, what is the electric field inside?

I have done some research already on this idea. Sounds like you're describing a single plate capacitor which as I've read makes the opposing "plate" a sphere of infinite size.  I cannot answer the questions you asked but would appreciate if you could provide some direction to answer them.

Regarding the water outside the sphere, I can only imagine it would polarize.  Regarding the inside of the sphere, I imagine it would have a charge nearly equal to the outside.