Author Topic: How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!  (Read 34195 times)

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #112 on: September 30, 2015, 05:30:30 am »
What RMS voltage is required for the polarization process?

I will tell you.  Perhaps you remember those who do electrolysis with electrolyte and neutral plates.  They put enough neutral plates between the positive and negative to divide the voltage enough to still cause electrolysis but keep voltage down to reduce heat.  I believe, without checking, that it ended up being about 1.47V minimum to achieve electrolysis between two electrodes.

The same principle applies to the cells in series.  The number of cells times the 1.47V (or whatever it is) should dictate the minimum RMS voltage to polarize the water and eventually create the gas.  The only difference is that we are doing it with a resonant wave form and opposing coils to restrict the current.  We then will use high voltage pulses rather than current to do the work.  Higher voltages will perform more work, but my theory says the minimum RMS voltage will be based on the number of cells you have in series.

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #113 on: September 30, 2015, 05:35:05 am »
The capacitance range.

The capacitance range will dictate your frequency range.  The capacitance range will be between your cells capacitance without water (ei. 10pF) up to your cells capacitance with water (ei. 600pF).  Since the coils will have a static inductance, your frequency range should end up being between sub 1kHz when the cell isn't producing hho up to 10kHz or higher when it is as there will be significant air pockets in the tubes when it is producing hho.