Author Topic: How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!  (Read 34361 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3607
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #104 on: September 29, 2015, 09:53:49 am »
well electrolysis is one step... dc forces the ions to flow...and at the electrodes they lose and gain electrons... theoretically the negative will get closer to the positive electrode when it arrive there its charge has to flow thru the source to get the other side and discharge the oposite ion. this consume the power...

if you could get the negative ion close to the positive electrode without enough voltage why would it not discharge to it?

if we short the capacitor why would it stop generating?

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 421
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #105 on: September 29, 2015, 13:23:42 pm »
What do we know happens when we put a current through water?  We get gas.  What if we have a bunch of cells in series.  We need enough voltage to cross all the cells and then we get gas.  What if we have the voltage but not the current? 

Think about what we already know about electrolysis.

generally with only voltage without the current you have.... no gas.

 Thank you.  Theres the start.

What do you have instead?

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 421
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #106 on: September 29, 2015, 13:25:46 pm »
well electrolysis is one step... dc forces the ions to flow...and at the electrodes they lose and gain electrons... theoretically the negative will get closer to the positive electrode when it arrive there its charge has to flow thru the source to get the other side and discharge the oposite ion. this consume the power...

if you could get the negative ion close to the positive electrode without enough voltage why would it not discharge to it?

if we short the capacitor why would it stop generating?

Excellent!  We have leakage!

With minimal to nearly no current, where will the leakage appear?

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 421
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #107 on: September 29, 2015, 18:06:07 pm »
What might happen if you hit the two electrodes with a high voltage spike?

Basically, a current MUST flow, otherwise no hv spike!

Same with charging a capacitor
The real question is how short that burst aka voltage peak and current flow needs to be and what to do after that burst.
I think Meyer states to extract the feeded electrons together with the freed electrons using the eec....

I don't follow this.  You can have a high voltage charge with no current flowing.  Not sure how it applies to my questions either.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 421
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #108 on: September 29, 2015, 18:08:19 pm »
well electrolysis is one step... dc forces the ions to flow...and at the electrodes they lose and gain electrons... theoretically the negative will get closer to the positive electrode when it arrive there its charge has to flow thru the source to get the other side and discharge the oposite ion. this consume the power...

if you could get the negative ion close to the positive electrode without enough voltage why would it not discharge to it?

if we short the capacitor why would it stop generating?

Excellent!  We have leakage!

With minimal to nearly no current, where will the leakage appear?

If you have a number of cells in series, will the leakage not start appearing first as bubbles on the tubes that have direct connections to the coils?  This being the shortest and least resistive route?  But even further question, is this what we want?  I'd have to say no.  We want to force this charge through the cells in series.  So, the cells need to be as isolated from each other as reasonably possible.  With the charge evenly distributed, wouldn't we have a greater chance of building up the necessary reaction we need in the "polarization process"?

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 609
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #109 on: September 30, 2015, 01:44:33 am »
well electrolysis is one step... dc forces the ions to flow...and at the electrodes they lose and gain electrons... theoretically the negative will get closer to the positive electrode when it arrive there its charge has to flow thru the source to get the other side and discharge the oposite ion. this consume the power...

if you could get the negative ion close to the positive electrode without enough voltage why would it not discharge to it?

if we short the capacitor why would it stop generating?

Excellent!  We have leakage!

With minimal to nearly no current, where will the leakage appear?

If you have a number of cells in series, will the leakage not start appearing first as bubbles on the tubes that have direct connections to the coils?  This being the shortest and least resistive route?  But even further question, is this what we want?  I'd have to say no.  We want to force this charge through the cells in series.  So, the cells need to be as isolated from each other as reasonably possible.  With the charge evenly distributed, wouldn't we have a greater chance of building up the necessary reaction we need in the "polarization process"?

I like this simple discussion....
The " polarization process ".... ill have to dig up the reading material and have a fresh look at the his writings.My head from past reading is  still leaning on the notion the polarization process is refering  to the applied  pulse riding on top of the positive DC offset matching the changed timeshare ratio ultimately seperating the io....I really want my head to have a clear and fresh understanding...there still seems to be a missing part from the scope shots ive seen of replicated waveforms....in the patent Seb challenged to find a missing part I see Stan showing a positive smaller pulse voltage inbetween the step charging effect,is this a DC offset voltage or what... there must be some constant DC voltage and I can not find reference to it.
Id like to read your understanding of the polarization process to take a stab at your last question.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 02:01:11 am by newguy »

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 421
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #110 on: September 30, 2015, 04:41:15 am »
well electrolysis is one step... dc forces the ions to flow...and at the electrodes they lose and gain electrons... theoretically the negative will get closer to the positive electrode when it arrive there its charge has to flow thru the source to get the other side and discharge the oposite ion. this consume the power...

if you could get the negative ion close to the positive electrode without enough voltage why would it not discharge to it?

if we short the capacitor why would it stop generating?

Excellent!  We have leakage!

With minimal to nearly no current, where will the leakage appear?

If you have a number of cells in series, will the leakage not start appearing first as bubbles on the tubes that have direct connections to the coils?  This being the shortest and least resistive route?  But even further question, is this what we want?  I'd have to say no.  We want to force this charge through the cells in series.  So, the cells need to be as isolated from each other as reasonably possible.  With the charge evenly distributed, wouldn't we have a greater chance of building up the necessary reaction we need in the "polarization process"?

I like this simple discussion....
The " polarization process ".... ill have to dig up the reading material and have a fresh look at the his writings.My head from past reading is  still leaning on the notion the polarization process is refering  to the applied  pulse riding on top of the positive DC offset matching the changed timeshare ratio ultimately seperating the io....I really want my head to have a clear and fresh understanding...there still seems to be a missing part from the scope shots ive seen of replicated waveforms....in the patent Seb challenged to find a missing part I see Stan showing a positive smaller pulse voltage inbetween the step charging effect,is this a DC offset voltage or what... there must be some constant DC voltage and I can not find reference to it.
Id like to read your understanding of the polarization process to take a stab at your last question.

I think a lot of this stuff is being way over complicated.  I have successfully achieved the correct wave form a few times now with coils that are properly in the zone.  I say in the zone as they are not tuned in yet.  You cannot change the laws of physics.  Basic electrical theory still applies and should be kept in mind.  The simplest laws can explain a great deal.  A lot of the time we seem to be looking for some sort of magic, but ultimately we are just not properly looking at all the elemental effects of physics.

Back to basics.  What are we polarizing.  Isn't it the water?  What does it mean to polarize the water?  It gets aligned with the electric fields.  What happens when it is fully polarized?  How long does it take to polarize?  These are the next questions.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 609
Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #111 on: September 30, 2015, 05:09:09 am »
well electrolysis is one step... dc forces the ions to flow...and at the electrodes they lose and gain electrons... theoretically the negative will get closer to the positive electrode when it arrive there its charge has to flow thru the source to get the other side and discharge the oposite ion. this consume the power...

if you could get the negative ion close to the positive electrode without enough voltage why would it not discharge to it?

if we short the capacitor why would it stop generating?

Ill take a stab at those 2: correct my errors please...

I think you will see all charged ions will eventually discharge...there probably wont be any gas generated but the voltage will bleed off...

I think if shorting the capacitor stops it generating it has no voltage applied to generate....
I like  reading the guys that can go all scientific with explanations too but no one else replied yet :)