Author Topic: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..  (Read 81426 times)

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #248 on: March 15, 2016, 09:08:31 am »
inductance is how much the amps increase as function of time and it has a reversal of voltage when current is stoped...

a capacitor is the oposite of this

i believe the meter wont be able to show proper value connected to the cell

i was wondering about the electrostatic filter steve and why would it be electrostatic at all

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrostatic_precipitator

i believe it must be the negative part of the system...

what if we elctrolyse a solution with net charge?

Say if its negative it can be accelerated to move back and forth by alternating positive pulses to the electrodes..

for example if it were a sodium hydroxide solution very dilute... the sodium ions are positive correct?

in pure water we see no hydrogen because of recombination... as there is the same amount of ions as the oposite ions attach to each other before reaching the electrode.. but what if there was only one type of ions? like oh- geting on another oh- by some resonant action?
« Last Edit: March 16, 2016, 06:51:29 am by sebosfato »

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #249 on: March 15, 2016, 09:16:42 am »
Electrolyte selection[edit]

Hoffman voltameter connected to a direct current power supply
If the above described processes occur in pure water, H+ cations will accumulate at the anode and OH− anions will accumulate at the cathode. This can be verified by adding a pH indicator to the water: the water near the anode is acidic while the water near the cathode is basic. The negative hydroxide ions that approach the anode mostly combine with the positive hydronium ions (H3O+) to form water. The positive hydronium ions that approach the negative cathode mostly combine with negative hydroxide ions to form water. Relatively few hydronium/hydroxide ions reach the cathode/anode. This can cause a concentration overpotential at both electrodes.

Pure water is a fairly good insulator since it has a low autoionization, Kw = 1.0 x 10−14 at room temperature and thus pure water conducts current poorly, 0.055 µS·cm−1. Unless a very large potential is applied to cause an increase in the autoionization of water the electrolysis of pure water proceeds very slowly limited by the overall conductivity.

If a water-soluble electrolyte is added, the conductivity of the water rises considerably. The electrolyte disassociates into cations and anions; the anions rush towards the anode and neutralize the buildup of positively charged H+ there; similarly, the cations rush towards the cathode and neutralize the buildup of negatively charged OH− there. This allows the continued flow of electricity.[6]

Care must be taken in choosing an electrolyte, since an anion from the electrolyte is in competition with the hydroxide ions to give up an electron. An electrolyte anion with less standard electrode potential than hydroxide will be oxidized instead of the hydroxide, and no oxygen gas will be produced. A cation with a greater standard electrode potential than a hydrogen ion will be reduced in its stead, and no hydrogen gas will be produced.

The following cations have lower electrode potential than H+ and are therefore suitable for use as electrolyte cations: Li+, Rb+, K+, Cs+, Ba2+, Sr2+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+. Sodium and lithium are frequently used, as they form inexpensive, soluble salts.

If an acid is used as the electrolyte, the cation is H+, and there is no competitor for the H+ created by disassociating water. The most commonly used anion is sulfate (SO2−
4), as it is very difficult to oxidize, with the standard potential for oxidation of this ion to the peroxydisulfate ion being −2.05 volts.

Strong acids such as sulfuric acid (H2SO4), and strong bases such as potassium hydroxide (KOH), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) are frequently used as electrolytes due to their strong conducting abilities.

A solid polymer electrolyte can also be used such as Nafion and when applied with a special catalyst on each side of the membrane can efficiently split the water molecule with as little as 1.5 Volts. There are also a number of other solid electrolyte systems that have been trialled and developed with a number of electrolysis systems now available commercially that use solid electrolytes.[7]

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #250 on: March 15, 2016, 12:48:27 pm »
Steve, Capacitors have no inductance. Only capacitance (nf, uF, pF, etc).

Only coils have inductance (and capacitance too).

The tubes on water can be very difficult to measure.

I know. Thats why i put the different settings and results in there.
Its fun to see the rresults, but i do not know if it brings me something...

Cheers!

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #251 on: March 15, 2016, 15:43:24 pm »
Stan said Faraday would have had to have the propperties of stainless steel to get the results he did...stainless steel...at least 304 is non magnetic...it has no effect in terms of inductance.... thinking out loud with ya :) meter just arrived ...keep on keepin on :)

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #252 on: March 15, 2016, 18:39:33 pm »
http://www.tdiinternational.com/contents/en-us/d505_dg-chemical-compatibility.html

check this compatibility chart for delrin material

basically it indicate that sodium hydroxide and potassium is ok with it..

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #253 on: March 18, 2016, 09:19:25 am »
I realized something.... maybe the 11 water resonant cell is actually the electrical polarization generator... the one in the dealership manual..

i mean it has two separated water inputs the central one and the other that goes to water channel and distributes to the cells...

mEYER states that it only need the positive to work... but you can provide to colect the negative charges too...

if the water level is to be mantained bellow the caps the water may also stay by equilibrium in the same high level on the center of the cell

there is the possibility that the thing worked to concentrate negative or positive ions on both cavities formed... cells and the cup in center of the cells

the close proximity indicate there will be maximum force...

i believe it may work as a sort of kelvind water droper in the sense that it may split charge that may be carried out by the bubbles and or ions and this will provide electricity and gas accordingly...

i was thinking about  a two stage ion spliter consisting of three tubes one being the ground and than subsequentially apply positive and ground to the other two tubes sequentialy switching than off ...

just some food for thought... i think i related the resonant cavity cell to the polarization generator by the configuration of the cup in the middle...

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #254 on: March 18, 2016, 09:43:57 am »
Its a nice thought.... :)

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Re: The VIC with resonant cavity project by Steve..
« Reply #255 on: March 19, 2016, 13:48:34 pm »
there are very few ways in which is possible  to generate electricity.. .

i believe some basic principle is required.. we need to think a source of electricity as a source of current comming from a certain potential, just like the water in a waterfall would be the current and the high the potential..

than is necessary to abstract how would water constant liberate ion?