Author Topic: Why plexyglass?  (Read 13194 times)

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2014, 23:01:03 pm »
inside a closed surface there's zero electric field due to gauss law and charge distribution... if there are 2 cylinders and you charge - the inside cylinder the outside cylinder has - the inside cylinder voltage on the outside of it's surface and + on the inside surface , H2O can have a redox reaction and then a capacitance is formed between the two cylinder lowering the energy of the system, this is how energy is conserved... I found ways with B field but the highest B field available is on the order of some teslas and this is simply not enough to break the homopolar bond of water..in comparison this force with 1.5T is an order higher than 100k volts field equivalent...no real application here.. there's no way to apply enough force from my point of view...maybe something to do with resonance, if you're talking about a redox reacton then you would have found a way to produce more energy anyway and you wouldn't need hydrogen..  its funny how nature is made -causality-
« Last Edit: June 21, 2014, 23:17:35 pm by geon »

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #25 on: June 21, 2014, 23:17:22 pm »
lots of lurckers here....

well, i am going to run some more tests with big and small chokes...
I just need prove that hv can split water......

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #26 on: June 21, 2014, 23:19:40 pm »
hv alone can't split water... you are talking about big forces here.. the only way a bond "breaks" is either energy equivalent to that bond energy is given or the final bond will be in a lower energy level and the difference in energy is greater than the first bond energy..a redox reaction is not splitting water.. it just a typical electrochemical reaction and it can take place inside a cylinder. in order to have a redox reaction you must have enough electrons ( current ) with enough electrovolt potential ..in which case you have an electrolysis cell..

you need roughly 1.5x10^(-5) N to break water... thats about 10^14 Volts...

what if the coating he used for the cylinder adsorbed water ? then the force would be really higher..
« Last Edit: June 22, 2014, 00:00:31 am by geon »

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #27 on: June 22, 2014, 01:47:06 am »
i got some bubbles and resonance here! step charging when gating ...

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #28 on: June 22, 2014, 15:23:45 pm »
I agree that you could apply a million volt to the cell and yet see nothing happen... that not because its not possible, thats because something is missing.

I got some bubbles here probably because of the resonance... but i think i need still higher voltage to get what i'm saying to happening...

A lightning clearly can not do what i'm proposing simply because its not able to raise the potential of a portion of sea that much the potential remais across the air... probably some molecules are ionized and rapidly stabilize since they are in direct contact with ground...

So i say to you if you had to apply a coil to restrict the current of your cell and allow the voltage to do the work .. would you put it on the positive or on the negative side?

And if you put it on the negative side the water the electrodes and the coil form what?
« Last Edit: June 22, 2014, 16:33:27 pm by sebosfato »

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there are two things
« Reply #29 on: June 22, 2014, 15:57:41 pm »
Meyer Said two things...

1 potential is doing all the work
and two now on his graphics
the hydrogen production increases geometrically increasing the potential, the frequency (amp restriction) and the current leakage...

I think he even stated that it can become  self sustaining oscilating system, generating the electricity from water to sustain resonance.

So there must be a minimum potential and a minimum current required to achieve on the so desired demand production, as simple as it can be. Of course Meyer studied with science, taking notes doing graphics and tables, doing measurements .... and he knew the threshold that needed to be overcome.

We knew very few from him, just some of the operational parameters... 40kv 1miliamp 40w, have to use 5 amps big deal, 100v 100a 10kw, 10khz, 5khz, isolated cavity...

Did any of you ever opened a microwave engineering book?

Steve i think the flyback or ignition coils could have too much resistance so very small current ability...
 
« Last Edit: June 22, 2014, 16:35:44 pm by sebosfato »

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Not redox
« Reply #30 on: June 22, 2014, 16:41:51 pm »
Hey Geon, Mookie

what if it were not a redox reaction only! but a cascading event , avalanche like.. .?

or could we call it field assisted redox reaction?

I guss not...

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2014, 00:56:44 am »

If the electric field is strong enough, the free electron gains sufficient energy to liberate a further electron when it next collides with another molecule. The two free electrons then travel towards the anode and gain sufficient energy from the electric field to cause impact ionisation when the next collisions occur; and so on.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Townsend_discharge