Author Topic: Why plexyglass?  (Read 13195 times)

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Why plexyglass?
« on: June 14, 2014, 02:56:35 am »
Why? Stan says voltage potential perform work in a capacitor.

I will try to explain how i see it..

If you have charge anywhere in space you get electric fields. The electric fields over a distance form a potential difference.

All this patents that uses insulators need to get very high voltage to get the electric fields high enough to split the water molecule.

I think stan simply didn't used a closed circuit for the high voltage part of the circuit and now the function of the double chokes become visible. I mean if you have a very high voltage being applied to the inner electrode for example 100kv and you close the circuit by using a very high resistor just to allow some current to flow. but also now if you didn't understood the wiper arm becomes a manner to generate a low voltage higher current to just force the capacitor further. thats why the diode is there and don't need to get very high voltage requirements.

So what i wanted to mean is that meyer indeed applied 40kv but not across the cell, between the inner plates and the ground! So the gases that come out of it has electrons striped off all the way.

For example if you get a charged inner tube the outer tube will have a potential difference between them. but if you connect one to each other the charge jumps to the outer and the electric fields goes to zero because its a faraday cage.

So the chokes work in such a manner as to kind of generate a voltage to electrolysis to happen...
 

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2014, 10:24:49 am »
Why? Stan says voltage potential perform work in a capacitor.

I will try to explain how i see it..

If you have charge anywhere in space you get electric fields. The electric fields over a distance form a potential difference.

All this patents that uses insulators need to get very high voltage to get the electric fields high enough to split the water molecule.

I think stan simply didn't used a closed circuit for the high voltage part of the circuit and now the function of the double chokes become visible. I mean if you have a very high voltage being applied to the inner electrode for example 100kv and you close the circuit by using a very high resistor just to allow some current to flow. but also now if you didn't understood the wiper arm becomes a manner to generate a low voltage higher current to just force the capacitor further. thats why the diode is there and don't need to get very high voltage requirements.

So what i wanted to mean is that meyer indeed applied 40kv but not across the cell, between the inner plates and the ground! So the gases that come out of it has electrons striped off all the way.

For example if you get a charged inner tube the outer tube will have a potential difference between them. but if you connect one to each other the charge jumps to the outer and the electric fields goes to zero because its a faraday cage.

So the chokes work in such a manner as to kind of generate a voltage to electrolysis to happen...

Well, i can go with this, Sebos.
So, the 2 electrodes receive a high potential of + and what will be the ground for you in this setup?




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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2014, 12:35:21 pm »
In my opinion the ground is simply the stable state, an arbitrary reference or the most neutral point in the circuit.   

For example for a isolated cavity if you apply positive to the inside the outside is going to be negative if you not ground it... but if you do not ground and selected the most negative point in the circuit to call it ground than you can see the voltages potential in each point of the circuit.

The idea is that the chokes might receive high voltage pulses to restrict the amps acting like a transformer...

the first inductor say the one right after the diode act as a primary and the other choke acts as a secondary so as the first inductor restrict the amps as the other send a negative pulse to one electrode. During the collapse of the field the voltage now clearly reverts doubling the frequency and revealing an important aspect of the wiper arm. In the sense that if the wiper coil has half the turns its going to have lower voltage so as its voltage now subtract from the voltage of the first inductor as they are in series as its voltage is smaller the pulse still doubles... If it were bigger for example the doubled pulse would not be across the cell but the bif chokes would bring the potential of both electrodes to the same direction.

So basically the circuit stan show is not correct at all. The chokes position at leas the lower choke is wrong! At least Misleading!

« Last Edit: June 14, 2014, 13:51:48 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2014, 13:21:40 pm »
this where meyer inspiration i guess patent 3772180 cited in his patent 5149407 Process and apparatus for the production of fuel gas and the enhanced release of thermal energy from such gas

the arrangement in series increase the ionization of the gas... and bang

Guess where the choke goes now?

So the correct manner to actually see the pulses doubling in the oscilloscope is to have two high voltage probes and subtract the signals in the oscilloscope. so the ac high voltage part disappear and you can measure the analog voltage across the cell.

you can consider as blocks, power supply>f.gen>switching>HV transformer>rectifiers > Chokes > cell

And what happens is that as theres very high charge at one plate at a time the water molecules gives up its electrons and the are available at the doubling pulse time for sub sequential discharge EEC. As the diode prevent the electrode from discharge and the choke doubles the frequency you get a double effect, as long as it happens fast enough to allow the reaction go without discharging. I guess the magic happens at the gate time because the molecules will be are already separated and they will want to collapse but at this point the choke double the pulse giving it a path to discharge while charging the other electrode Giving the impetus for the current to flow...

A curious thing about concentric tubes.

The outer tube if charged or uncharged seems to not have an electric field inside of it. Zero. So if you think about you want to put charge in the inner tube first! since its going to be much much important to forme the electric fields with the other plate when you apply the charge to the outer tub
e!

 
« Last Edit: June 14, 2014, 13:53:59 pm by sebosfato »

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If the chokes are a transformer than what?
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2014, 14:03:27 pm »
I guess that the secret is the operation of the chokes in the sense that they have a very important impact in the technology. I think meyer added a variable resistor to tune the coupling between the coils or not limited to that! In the logic that we want to flex the molecule maybe I believer the resistor is in series with the wiper coil or the lower value coil and my best guess is that is there for directing the current thru the chokes. so he maybe uses only one diode.. the resistor will mess up with the collapsing of the field too. If allows faster collapsing fields. 


Perhaps is good enough one diode since the wiper choke will mimic the voltage of the first choke, giving the the cell already a pulse of voltage during the initial pulse. You see? Although its charging each tube positively the other will be charged to a potential whatever and the important is that the electric field is there acting causing no harm consuming no power and forcing the current to flow in the circuit formed.

Is kind of genius ! very xxxxxxx amazing! I hope i'm right... I got that because i understood that meyer started over from tay he principle but he wanted to get around the high cost difficult processing of materials and he wanted it to be able to be done in the garage.

He wanted to use just couple of electronics and raw materials like copper wire, acrylic, ferrits, stales steel tubes, ferrite cores, delrin material, and plenty fresh water.

Think about why he used a very think acrylic tube?

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2014, 14:03:50 pm »
I feel something good coming up.
From who is this text:

The unidirectional potential may be infinitely variable up to about 40,000 volts. Excellent results have been obtained by using about 5,000 volts per inch of electrode spacing. A general range is 3,500 volts per inch of electrode spacing to 15,000 or more volts per inch of electrode spacing. In this type of operation the current or amperage is kept at a minimum and preferably does not exceed 85 milliamperes.

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2014, 14:06:01 pm »
i ll tell you.
Its not Stanley Meyer.....
read this pdf

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Re: Why plexyglass?
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2014, 15:10:40 pm »
Other forms of unidirec
tional potential can be employed such as are derived,
for example, by superimposing an alternating current on
a direct current to produce a pulsating direct current
which is unidirectional.
 
from that same patent!

Tesla Rules.

Man i get a good feeling again. How much scotch you thing i took to get this idea? haha Wordcup Spirit.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2014, 15:25:53 pm by sebosfato »