Author Topic: Bifilar coil  (Read 12213 times)

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2014, 14:39:52 pm »
Some possibility there is that if the pulse is not inductive... the voltage across the water will simply neutralize after pulse off so the energy gets into the molecules (absorption) , theoretically if we could charge as many times possible the water. the higher the frequency the higher is the current so i think its counter to the direction meyer gave..... 

If you thin about apply a pulsed current makes a collection of charges on the electrodes.. given by capacitance and voltage applied. but when you reverse the voltage (inductive discharge) the current is absolutely restricted for that instant of time since the ions can't discharge... the only thing they can do is to be ballistically accelerated in the other direction. the description of resonant action. (gas on demand)

In water the ions do not actually travel... something i read some time ago says that water has a tunneling capability so the charge travels but the molecules ions structure changes in the way not moving... so basically theres no mass but the electron mass flowing thru the water molecules having some resistance in the way.. this is not the classical model anymore..
« Last Edit: April 13, 2014, 14:58:02 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2014, 15:54:11 pm »
but when you reverse the voltage

Why reverse the voltage (AC) ?

..Steve has it right.
Two nails in a bucket of water. High voltage / high amps. One direction (DC).

The idea is that first.. observing the waveform stan provided its not constant dc being applied... because those are graphs of voltage vs time across the cell. .
stan add that diode and i guess the real thing is not actually a diode at least not if you want to accomplish the things he mention... he describes the resonant action as the action of pulling back and forth the atoms and electrons in order to achieve gas on demand. This tell me two things. one is that analyzing the cell and if you apply dc the current has magiorly 3 limiting factors.... diffusion, transport and others  polarization is the problem the electrodes covered with the gas get charged to a certain voltage relative to another. the atoms are not allowed to oscillate in this way... however if you could collect for say 95 % percent of the time a certain charge and than bang it with high voltage my best guess is that its going to cause a kind of avalanche effect... of very high probability to generate gas on demand.

It would even explain that the restriction of amps occur in the sense that the there is more product from the reaction than amps flowing in the circuit somehow..

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2014, 15:57:18 pm »
the massless dirac state of the electrons doesnt appy for water to my knowledge...

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2014, 15:59:22 pm »
the massless dirac state of the electrons doesnt appy for water to my knowledge...

i was looking to understand how the ionic transport occur in water and found something like that but i'm not sure about how much is true or not.. 

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2014, 16:12:11 pm »
I agree that electron transport in different materials can make a difference with conservative forces...

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2014, 16:14:33 pm »
...observing the waveform stan provided

OK ..I give up.

By that i mean the unipolar pulses... they always come back to zero. but when stan shows Va to Vn with the lines the zeros become negative pulses actually .. since i'm assuming theres a biasing voltage applied too. 
« Last Edit: April 14, 2014, 11:56:22 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2014, 09:41:17 am »
do you know what you need? you need this
« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 13:30:52 pm by geon »

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Re: Bifilar coil
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2014, 14:31:54 pm »
wish i could understand what you talk about.