Author Topic: The Dc resonant transformer  (Read 25106 times)

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2014, 06:36:05 am »
You can only destroy a field with a countering field, it seems to me that you are trying to use lenz law to analyse it.. and i'm saying that its not completely valid from this point of view. You should try to only think about induction and departure from a referential where you know what os going on..

If you get a magnet away it indeed create a field in the same direction in order to cause attraction and react to the movement. But in this case i don't know... theres no mechanic movement but there is flux changing somehow and the sign of the change that should matters its my best guess.

 

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2014, 07:15:14 am »
(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2817.0;attach=13202;image)

Lets ignore this magnet and the directions of the fields for now.

And let the positive go to the primary dot so during pulse on. according to the right hand rule the magnetic field i correctly represented by the yellow arrow. correct?
 At the secondary dot than there should be a positive but of course going out of the dot and that makes its magnetic field obviously contrary to the primary field if its connected to a load. That happen because the field in the primary is increasing positive change of flux.

Now imagine you have switch off  the current and there is a flyback diode connected to the primary. In the primary the current still wants to flow in the same direction but to do that it must reverse the voltage in the primary.

In coils the current is not allowed to change if you try to change it creates a back emf that restricts the amps as function of the inductance and time.

At the secondary the voltage also reverses because now the flux is changing negatively… So during pulse off in a transformer being pulsed the secondary will also have a negative in the dot so as the primary. So during pulse off their currents should be in the same direction such as their magnetic field. The time the magnetic field is going to take to arrive at zero depends on the resistance of the secondary the rate of dissipation thereof. Ohh if the diode is connected to the primary as flyback one what happens is the same as the current flow the magnetic field keeps going strong.

If you think about ac square wave is also possible to understand that if a counter voltage is applied where i consider pulse off what happens is that the primary flyback voltage kind of initially impede the flow of amps since is a BEMF.

But lets think about the secondary magnetic field. During pulse on it has a contrary field to the primary magnetic field. But during the pulse off ( the fall of the magnetic field ) the current reverses and so it creates a north pole that wants to keep the magnetic field if the load allows the current to flow.

So i guess you are correct in a transformer the secondary creates a field during the fall of the magnetic field that opposes the reduction of the field. 


I'm thinking that you are right because i'm thinking that i'm reducing the field but maybe its increasing from a negative value to zero and not decreasing and this could make me to confuse about the direction of the induction…. thats what you mean?

Too bad If you are correct =( and probably you are!

Its the end of the magic new years eve.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2014, 07:35:13 am by sebosfato »

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2014, 11:21:38 am »
can you exploit the magnetic viscoscity of ferromagnetic materials?

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #43 on: January 05, 2014, 16:54:33 pm »
Thanks again geon for thinking together and find this result which will save me time.

What you mean by exploit the magnetic viscosity?

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #44 on: January 05, 2014, 17:02:02 pm »
I can be wrong as well , it's best to see for yourself you know what I mean?

remember some time ago the capacitor - coil mechanism you mentioned that changes the magnetic permeability with respect to dielectric permeability, maybe there's a way to extract some energy out of this thing because it takes some time for atoms to align to different fields.. and this is an open circuit..

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2014, 21:43:54 pm »
Im just learning how the distributed capacitance of the secondary windings discharge and induce a voltage back into the primary so im a looong way from seeing anything else :/

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Re: Special announce
« Reply #46 on: January 06, 2014, 01:30:17 am »
I guess i discovered a way to extract energy from space time using a magnet and a transformer

The first time i saw something strange regarding adding magnets to coils is that when i had my resonant tank with the magnet simply glued to the coil the voltage was higher. I didn't had the knowledge to understand why it happened… 

Basically the way we use transformers is rather stupid.

The primary sets a positive changing magnetic field that induce in the secondary a current in the opposite direction than the current in the primary. Obviously than the magnetic field in it will cancel the primary magnetic field. Thats the basics of Lenz law, when a magnet approximates to a shorted coil the induced current in the coil will create a magnetic field that opposes or create a contrary force to the movement of the magnet.

This new year i thought a way to induce a current in the secondary in the same direction as the current going into the primary, by a negative changing magnetic field that  results in the current induced on the secondary reinforcing the primary magnetic field instead of killing it which should further induce greater emf in the secondary. So it wont create that counter magnetic field that makes transformers to consume high amps when loaded. 

Its the situation of a magnet dropping into a coil but instead of being repel by the lenz reaction force, the induced current creates a magnetic field ever increasing that only causes more attraction and induction and so on. 

Its all theory but i guess its correct since i used only physics laws to develop it.


Happy new year
 

You going to use some kind of mobius strip coil?

I like the idea of an ever increasing, complementary field on the secondary.  If the field is non linear, with the right phase composition, current might be pumped from point A to point B on the shorted secondary.  (Shape resonance might be required.)  Or the secondary might be semi shorted, with a diode or an AV diode plug, or even an asymmetric plasma.  Can you make the non linear effect with a circuit, without having to drop a magnet through the coil?

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #47 on: January 06, 2014, 18:30:35 pm »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Möbius_strip   thats very cool…

I was thinking about how wrong i was in my assumptions and decided to look deeper into the problem.

Lets suppose you get a coil and a magnet free to move. And you apply a north opposing field to make the magnet move away from the coil.

In my analysis what happens is that the magnet going away induces a south in the primary and that induces a counter electromotive force that limits the current going into the coil. Now lets analyze if there were a secondary there. The positive into the dot of the primary makes the dot north pole as makes also the dot of the secondary positive but a current flow into the secondary induces a counter magnetic field that reduces the force that makes the magnet go away. .

The back Emf induced by the motion of the magnet is in same direction of the induced positive by transformer action...



I have thought about the thane bitoroid transformer, and imagined how it suppose to operate.

Basically the primary induce a voltage in the secondary but the back magnetic field generated into the coil by the current flowing into the load has another path to go, this path goes to another secondary and sums with the primary field to induce in this third secondary a voltage. but his design if both secondary are loaded their field seems to counter each other.

I started than to think about what if we had a kind of diode for magnetic fields. I though, and maybe a magnet or electromagnet could be handy on that.

so i created two alternative paths for the magnetic field reaction from the secondary to make it always reforce the primary field in both secondaries. each reforming one another…

who knows...