Author Topic: The Dc resonant transformer  (Read 25111 times)

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #112 on: January 27, 2014, 16:48:08 pm »
well I know what electric potential is and it's zero outside C1 and the two fields add inside, you should ask what happens during charging and this I'm not sure about because you give energy to charge the plates of C2 to reach the Q of C1 and in this period you form two other capacitors that lower the voltage of C1 temporarily , displacement current depends on change in electric flux, if C1 E field decreases then there's an opposite displ. current in C1 because the change is a negative term and the displacement current has the same direction in the two other capacitors let's call them C3 C4 so in total there's displ. current going in the opposite direction of current flow , when Q1=Q2 there's positive displacement current going through all plates (this should be a larger one).. .. does this look logical to you?? \
« Last Edit: January 27, 2014, 18:14:08 pm by geon »

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #113 on: January 27, 2014, 21:42:28 pm »
maybe you could make a drawing i can't understand.

I was thinking about another thing. The same configuration you provided but charge one capacitor in reverse direction to the other.

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #114 on: January 28, 2014, 11:02:36 am »
I mean charge both capacitors in the same direction first charge C1 second C2

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #115 on: January 28, 2014, 11:16:39 am »
I mean charge both capacitors in the same direction first charge C1 second C2

I don't know if you understood.

If you charge one capacitor than you charge the other enclosing capacitor the you are still charging both capacitors.

If you charge one capacitor in one direction and the other in the opposite direction than interesting things happens,

The potential to charge the capacitor is going to enter with no opposition..

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #116 on: January 28, 2014, 12:04:41 pm »
(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2817.0;attach=13253;image)Check this out

First C1 gets charged to 100v for example...

Than C3 and C4 receives 100v from C1 plus 100v from coil 2 as coil 2 charges the C2 complex

So the C3 and C4 now have 100v each and C1 some voltage


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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #117 on: January 29, 2014, 14:24:53 pm »
I don't know if it's my dmm but when I charge C1 and C2 in the same direction with the same 1.2V voltage source where Q1>Q2 , C1 voltage is lower but C2 is higher charged to uncharged now the weird thing is the voltage of C1 almost triples when I charge C2 in the opposite direction while C2 is a little lower.. I don't know if it's my measurement ( contact points) but this does not make any sense. when Q2>Q1 C1 voltage reverses no matter what direction C2 is charged.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2014, 15:20:02 pm by geon »

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #118 on: January 29, 2014, 15:14:12 pm »
I don't know if it's my dmm but when I charge C1 and C2 in the same direction with the same 1.2V voltage source where Q1>Q2 , C1 voltage is lower but C2 is higher charged to uncharged now the weird thing is the voltage of C1 almost triples when I charge C2 in the opposite direction while C2 is a little lower.. I don't know if it's my measurement ( contact points) but this does not make any sense. now the last thing to try is with Q2>Q1 and see what happens.

if you charge it reversely the C1 voltage sums to the source voltage to charge the C2 reversing the voltage of C1 ...

is exactly what i described....

If you charge C2 ( the enclosing capacitor) first and than charge the c1 ok you are going to add some charge to c1. if do it reversely theres not going to change the voltage...



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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #119 on: January 29, 2014, 15:18:48 pm »
if Q2>Q1 voltage of C1 always reverses from what I measured because C3 and C4 are formed, I still need to test Q1=Q2..
« Last Edit: January 29, 2014, 16:12:25 pm by geon »