Author Topic: The Dc resonant transformer  (Read 25109 times)

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The Dc resonant transformer
« on: December 20, 2013, 13:01:54 pm »
I was thinking about the transformers operation and basically when you apply a positive to the dot at the other dot this positive is transported thru the changing magnetic field. When the secondary is loaded the electrons flow in opposite direction than at the primary this creates a counter magnetic field that reduced the primary magnetic field (vectors canceling) and thereto makes more current flow from the source to keep current flowing at the load.

This is the very basics o how a transformer worlk.

I was thinking about what it we could simply switch the magnetic field of an electromagnet or a magnet thru two magnetic circuits comprised of core and secondary and having a resonant coils that serves to direct the magnetic field.

In my point of view the magnetic field of the electromagnet magnet is not going to change since is static and thus its not being required to ever be generated.

Thereto the resonant circuit is tuned to have just enough current to allow the magnetic field change or switch as many times as possible thru the two magnetic circuits.

Does it makes sense?

 

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2013, 13:37:05 pm »
(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2817.0;attach=13166;image)From my point of view its also a frequency doubler since as the magnetic field increase and decrease 2 times in each cycle.

« Last Edit: December 20, 2013, 14:06:57 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2013, 16:24:50 pm »
Please answers, questions, opinions knowledge... whatever

during resonance the capacitor gets charged twice and discharge twice each full cycle such as the inductor theres two rises and two falling magnetic fields


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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2013, 21:29:18 pm »
Im just beginning to play with transformers myself... burnt up my last 2 yesterday :/

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2013, 16:04:21 pm »
If we could have a material such as a transistor for magnetic field than it were goping to be  easy?

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2013, 21:33:08 pm »
Hi Fabio,

Like always, i am impressed with your ideas :-)
I had done some xperiments with resonance transformers.
Its not so difficult to get resonance, however all power you extract from such resonanse setup, you always have to put back in... No magic or zero point energy, as far as i have seen..

Cheers
Steve

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2013, 13:36:15 pm »
Hi Fabio,

Like always, i am impressed with your ideas :-)
I had done some xperiments with resonance transformers.
Its not so difficult to get resonance, however all power you extract from such resonanse setup, you always have to put back in... No magic or zero point energy, as far as i have seen..

Cheers
Steve

Thanks Steve. I didn't succeed either yet to extract more power from resonance than i put in. But i never tried to think about this in this manner. About the magnetic field. Those brazilians got me thinking. Barbat, and donald L smith too,

If you remember the resonant circuit i show in 2008 when i added a magnet to the inductor the voltage raise a little 10 % but i could not measure what was really going at that time...

Now that i have some more knowledge i'm thinking not only on the coils numbers but also the geometry and the actual magnetic fields that are actuating in the circuit to try to get around the counter magnetomotive force. .

I guess is possible to build a material that can shield magnetic fields spending little energy just like a transistor does to electric current.

This would allow to switch huge static magnetic field (very low cost) generating infinite amounts of power, depending on the frequency and the sizes of the coils and magnets. The answer to this is how do we control the flow of magnetic field.

I learned at university that magnetic fields do not cross each other, so maybe using a perpendicular geometry we could switch the field without causing induction,,

In this circuit i tried to decouple the resonance from the induction to use the resonance just to switch the fields resonantly... 

I'm still thinking about that,,,,

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2013, 18:23:31 pm »
The only real system that can turn off its magnetic propertys is a coil.
Its my only other project, besides the water as fuel project, too.
Its with magnets and coils.
But not on the conventional manner. The idea took two years and its adult enough now to build the first setup.
Will make some pics of it when it runs.
Of course i have high hopes on a selfsustaining machine  :)
The road to this setup was fun enough. I learned a lot.

And still workin here on the gas separation, monotomic hydrogen cell / ammonia cell.
Both projects i hope to share, when people like.

Cheers
Steve