Author Topic: Dynode  (Read 7593 times)

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2013, 02:21:21 am »
The impact needs a target such as metal or ceramic.  I'm correlating this with Meyer's heat diffuser, in his water rocket system.  We don't want that plate to give off SE electrons so I'm thinking it should have a carbonized surface.  Maybe a single graphene layer.

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2013, 13:40:16 pm »
That near infra red technology was used is undeniable.

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2013, 07:53:23 am »
That near infra red technology was used is undeniable.

I've been wondering if the same thing could be done by passing the gasses through a positive corona for some distance.  Presuming the goal is to prevent the oxygen from burning the H until after the sub quantum heat is released.  Some people say H will not burn after it shrinks in an atomic hydrogen oven, but Randall Mills at Black Light Power says some compounds can be produced.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2013, 00:22:37 am by electrotek »

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2013, 10:15:04 am »
Have you read about atomic welding, mr. Electrotek?


Steve

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2013, 10:51:59 am »
Remember, the 'size' of an atom has nothing to do with the size of the nucleus. It has to do with the size of the valence shell (which itself is not well-defined*).

So, if we neglect change in electrical attraction, the size should stay the same—a shell is a shell and it need not 'expand' to accomodate electrons.

Now, as we add more protons and electrons, the attraction between the nucleus and shell increases and the shell contracts. Thus the atom gets smaller.

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2013, 11:41:45 am »
atomic size decreases going up and right in the periodic table has to do with atomic number z and subshell configuration if you add more electrons there's a shielding effect that reduces the effective charge of the nucles and makes ithe atom bigger..more protons less electrons = smaller atom

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2013, 14:13:41 pm »
thats is correct... because as there are less electrons in the orbits the electrons last will be attracted more strongly to the nucleus....

Thats why is harder  to keep ionizing an ionized atom. 

I still believe that the fracturing process is related to charge the hydrogen negatively and to charge the oxygen positively .... and let they bang together...  I hope to start testing it soon. right after i'm able tot make a car self run on water hydrogen....

My friend here (mechanic) tells that on old beatles they use to inject water to increase the power but use to melt the pistons because water creates very big pressure.

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Re: Dynode
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2013, 21:20:58 pm »
Have you read about atomic welding, mr. Electrotek?


Steve
The atomic hydrogen welding torch is one thing which gives me optimism in this business.  When the gas is passed through an electric arc, it does gain energy.  However, this increase in energy isn't as great as the welding energy released when the H impacts the work metals.  This energy output comes from the sub quantum transitions associated with the atom's shrinking in size.  It's more than a case in which electron orbitals are expanded, due to external energy being added, then only the added energy being released.  Both Meyer's system and the hydrogen torch remove the electrons before the heat reaction occurs, so it may be the size of the proton itself which changes as the energy of one gram of tnt, or fraction thereof, is released, due to the sub quantum nuclear reaction.

There's a new variation of the torch which is out that uses water rather than straight hydrogen.  It also produces 12,000 degrees, but with alcohol added, it's 14,000.  Although it is adjustable and can also be used for soldering and brazing, as well as cutting.  I can get one at a discount, since I'm an experimenter.

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