Author Topic: Free energy from an electric field!  (Read 10568 times)

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2013, 21:30:16 pm »
2d materials? Like graphene?

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2013, 10:30:12 am »
in monolayer graphene electrons only have one way to go but I'm not sure if classical mechanics applies there, it's complex stuff for me.

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #26 on: October 08, 2013, 21:51:34 pm »
I was planning on creating an electron cloud with an electron emitter from an old tv. I came across a thread on a physics forum where someone stated that these electrons were just part of the circuit and enter back into it when hit the screen. This kind of puts a hole in my plans. Anyone have any good suggestions for creating an electron cloud?

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #27 on: October 08, 2013, 23:19:48 pm »
You would need to confine them like antimatter, you need an electromagnetic bottle... 

Of course the electrons need to complete the circuit, so the energy they gained derives from the electric force imposed.

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #28 on: October 08, 2013, 23:27:45 pm »
Hmm ok, I was under the impression they were just released from a heated filament and were actually free electrons.

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2013, 07:42:55 am »
The magnetic bottle doesn't work as far as I know because the electrons interact with each other and they escape the magnetic field... when they escape they complete the circuit. I need a vacuum system really... I don't suppose anyone knows about a cheap diffusion pump without much shipping cost to my country? or I need a mig welder to build one..

the simplest configuration is with a capacitor the electric field is easily achieved this way but if the electrons hit the positive plate the ciruit will have made all the work ..the trick is to never hit the positive plate...

with 10kv in cap and initial 100v 4300% energy gain or more!.. with 5% out you have a "COP" of 2// trajectory of the electron is very hard to calculate I wonder how big diameter of a coil will take energy out.. HOW could I extract heat from the system?

Maybe meyer's circle coil thing has similarities..EPG


some precision equipment is needed \\  will write letter to santa for christmass

hint of the day: use magnets
« Last Edit: October 09, 2013, 12:48:33 pm by geon »

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2013, 17:28:16 pm »
I was planning on creating an electron cloud with an electron emitter from an old tv. I came across a thread on a physics forum where someone stated that these electrons were just part of the circuit and enter back into it when hit the screen. This kind of puts a hole in my plans. Anyone have any good suggestions for creating an electron cloud?

A cloud of stationary electrons can be produced by sending an electron beam through a couple of nylon threads, around a half inch apart.  The nylon causes the beam to stop moving.

I was wondering why we can't take a crt and use an electret for the second anode?  Power output would go from the screen electrode, through a load, then back to a cold cathode emitter, which operates on potential only.

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Re: Free energy from an electric field!
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2013, 19:18:52 pm »
hmmm how does cold cathode emitter doesnt consume power if electrons circulate ?