Author Topic: What else?  (Read 4753 times)

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Re: What else?
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2013, 14:48:40 pm »
of course, but i'm not saying that.

i'm only saying that for a capacitor of 1 faraday to get 1 volt it must flow 1 coulomb of charge, if its done in one second 1 ampere will be the average current...

1A at how many volts?  0.1?  1?  1000V. Does it matter?  The amount of charge still has to be dependant on the voltage doesn't it?  Or are we assuming 1V as was stated in the previous sentence?   I'm sorry, but its not very clear to me in context.


TS


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Re: What else?
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2013, 02:56:04 am »
its the definition...
don-t confuse charge with voltage, charge stands for coulombs...

if you apply 1 volt to a 1 faraday capacitor the instant peak current depeds only on the resistance of the circuit. this will tell how fast a capacitor can charge or discharge...

if you apply 1 volt to a 0 resistance 1henrie inductor it will take one second to get 1 amp flowing

try on simulation... this is the definition of henrie and faraday

they are similar and exactly the oposite...

the difference is

at the capacitor only will flow 1 coulomb per volt per faraday and stuck there

at the inductor with 0 resistance the current just keep increasing evenly at constant voltage applied... if time allow it... 

again at the capacitor the voltage increase constantly at constant current flow for example...

BR

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Re: What else?
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2013, 04:17:15 am »
something that confuses me are the diffrence in charge and joules specifically:

electron charge (e) = 1.60E-19 C
electron volt   (eV)= 1.60E-19 joule

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Re: What else?
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2013, 20:57:09 pm »
simple is the energy that one electron would gain if cross a potential of 1 volt thats why its got the same numbers..

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Re: What else?
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2013, 01:24:57 am »
simple is the energy that one electron would gain if cross a potential of 1 volt thats why its got the same numbers..
can you give me an explanation of a senerio if I have one 1,826volt electron with a potential diffrence of 11 volts, how many joules would that be?

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Re: What else?
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2013, 02:11:28 am »
Aside from that silly question... i just read this paragraph... something else i dont understand

"The charge of one electron might be used as a unit of electrical charge, since charges are created by displacement of electrons; but the charge of one electron is so small that it is impractical to use. The practical unit adopted for measuring charges is the COULOMB, named after the scientist Charles Coulomb. One coulomb is equal to the charge of 6,280,000,000,000,000,000 (six quintillion two hundred and eighty quadrillion) or (6.28 x 1018) electrons."

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Re: What else?
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2013, 05:32:31 am »
new guy... if we assume this 1,86ev is kinnetic energy than the sum dependes on the vector direction, if it will sum to the 11volts potential or subtract....

1 coulomb per second is 1 ampere.... so 6,28x10^18 x 1.6x10^-19 = 1 coulomb so coulomb is simply a measure of charge of a group of electrons good to work with, remember the charge of one electron is the smallest charge pĆ³ssible....

and again 1 amper/hour is 3600 coulombs

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Re: What else?
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2013, 05:34:53 am »
remembering what stan said 5 amps big deal... 40? big deal

Definition

If the rate of change of current in a circuit is one ampere per second and the resulting electromotive force is one volt, then the inductance of the circuit is one henry. Other equivalent combinations of SI units are as follows[3]:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/6/9/4/6940614d1ca6e739feb8171f2a27eba1.png)
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 07:01:49 am by sebosfato »