Author Topic: How Stanly Powered His alternator  (Read 50803 times)

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hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #88 on: April 08, 2008, 04:01:30 am »
im not sure they even make a 220 volt converter... hrmmm

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #89 on: April 08, 2008, 06:56:32 am »
im not sure they even make a 220 volt converter... hrmmm

I was looking for one and diddent find a 220v model

snoopy2005

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #90 on: April 08, 2008, 12:51:38 pm »
There is no problem getting a 220v converter in Europe, that is household supply,
getting a big anough migth be a problem.... (Is parallel a way to go?).

J@H

astuart

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #91 on: April 08, 2008, 20:38:48 pm »
I stumbled across something that might just be what we are looking for.  We achieved 10cc/sec output with a 9" 9 tube setup using an alternator as shown in the pic labeled astuart's circuit.  As you can see we connected the output to the input of the PWM.  This worked to produce about 6cc/sec.  Since we wanted to increase this to at least 10cc we decided to add some electrolyte to the water (we had been using tap water only till then).  What we chose, or actually had on hand, was baking soda.  I added about 4 tsp to the water and found that the current draw from the battery through the feebback loop directly to the cell was so great that it didn't leave enough to energize the rotor windings.  We came up with the idea of putting a switch int the line to the cell so that we could energize the alternator then flip the switch to the cell.  This didn't work at first because the draw from the cells would drop the voltage to the rotor and we would no longer have output from the alternator.  We decided then to add just 1 tsp to the cell and this worked.  We measured the output at 60cc in just over 6 secs.  However the wires leading to the cell were overheating, (14 gauge).  So we shut it down and replaced them with 10 gauge wire.  Here is where we found another problem with the feedback loop.  If you didn't engage the cell into the circuit within a couple of secs the alternator would have a runaway and smoke the PWM.  In the second photo you can see I modified the circuit by adding a couple of resistors, a zener diode to help regulate the voltage and another diode to block current from the battery directly to the cell.  I haven't tested this new circuit yet but thought I would show it to you guys and see what your thoughts were.  The alternator we are using is from a Dodge van late 80's early nineties I think, (it had a serpentine belt pulley) which I think they started using in the late eighties.  Correct me if I am wrong.  The only modification to the alternator was to disable the regulator otherwise it is factory.  Let me know what you think.


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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #92 on: April 08, 2008, 20:57:31 pm »
Looking good, sir.
Selfsustaining too!
And the electrolyte double gas output (almost)
But the negative side of chemicals is that you dont have clean air as output after burning in an engine....but thats my 2 cents.

br
steve

astuart

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #93 on: April 09, 2008, 04:12:02 am »
The chemical reaction is something I need to check into.  I think that baking soda is sodium bicarbonate or something similar.  I will have to check and see what other gases are being produced if any. KOH may be better.

hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #94 on: April 10, 2008, 13:10:24 pm »
hrmmmm

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #95 on: April 10, 2008, 17:32:32 pm »
hrmmmm

Say how they make it expand except with light energy?