Author Topic: How Stanly Powered His alternator  (Read 50799 times)

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #80 on: April 06, 2008, 22:44:04 pm »
Hi Kat,


Where did you read that you need a high frequency Variac?
The drawing is very specific about that it is a 60hz Variac.

br
steve

Hi stevie

Well if its only 60hz and its fixed then the alternator will have to spin only at 3600 rpm (converting 60hz to revolutions per minute) for the stator and rotor to be in resonance.

If the alternator slightly deviates from 3600 rpm there is no resonance. The other frequencies you will have  to try for resonance will be harmonic which means 7200 rpm and so on...

Another  way to match the rotor with the stator is to take the output of the stator and feed it back to the rotor through a variac.

But 60Hz strictly implies you have to have the alternator at 3600 rpm for it to be in resonance (rotor input and stator output @60hz)

I still think a Lawton PWM will allow gating, once high voltages are reached and therefore better suited for replicating stans set up.


Stevie and anyone with an alternator motor can you please source a 110 60Hz volt ac variac, rectify the output using a bridge rectifier and connect it to the rotor. Next make sure your alternator is spinning at 3600rpm and lets see if we get any gas production, by increasing the stator output voltage as stan does in his it runs on water video. At 3600 rpm the alternator should be in resonance at 60hz.

This is a simple and easy way to test the schematic.   

Kat,
 
What happens when your rotor/magnet is pulsing at 50hz, in my case and the revs are at the 2500rpm.
What do you think must happen in that state?


br
Steve

hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #81 on: April 07, 2008, 00:12:21 am »
Hi Kat,


Where did you read that you need a high frequency Variac?
The drawing is very specific about that it is a 60hz Variac.

br
steve

Hi stevie

Well if its only 60hz and its fixed then the alternator will have to spin only at 3600 rpm (converting 60hz to revolutions per minute) for the stator and rotor to be in resonance.

If the alternator slightly deviates from 3600 rpm there is no resonance. The other frequencies you will have  to try for resonance will be harmonic which means 7200 rpm and so on...

Another  way to match the rotor with the stator is to take the output of the stator and feed it back to the rotor through a variac.

But 60Hz strictly implies you have to have the alternator at 3600 rpm for it to be in resonance (rotor input and stator output @60hz)

I still think a Lawton PWM will allow gating, once high voltages are reached and therefore better suited for replicating stans set up.


Stevie and anyone with an alternator motor can you please source a 110 60Hz volt ac variac, rectify the output using a bridge rectifier and connect it to the rotor. Next make sure your alternator is spinning at 3600rpm and lets see if we get any gas production, by increasing the stator output voltage as stan does in his it runs on water video. At 3600 rpm the alternator should be in resonance at 60hz.

This is a simple and easy way to test the schematic.   

Yes, Thank you! But i get resonance at around 3400 rpms... I have learned you can get resonance at about any rpm by changing the amplitunde,,, BUT more gas is seen at 3k rpms for me!

Yes, thats the ideal,,, But now i don't run a self sustanning loop, i pulse the rotor with a chip because a variac dont do anything much... thanks....

BTW, the guy in florida that invinted the torch,, He did run his car on water, he used 260 amps from his added on alternator to do so, he ran this into another holding tank then into the intake...

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #82 on: April 07, 2008, 01:53:07 am »

[/quote]

Kat,
 
What happens when your rotor/magnet is pulsing at 50hz, in my case and the revs are at the 2500rpm.
What do you think must happen in that state?


br
Steve
[/quote]


At 50 hz, the rotor is pulsing 50 times a second or 3000 times a minute. (50 cycles/sec X 60 secs = 3000rpm)
The stator should ideally rotate at 3000 rpm to output 50hz ac for the alternator to be in resonance with the rotor.


Hydro and  others who have got resonance with your altnerators, what are the properties of a resonant alternator? How do we know its resonating?

I have no clue but theoretically i would assume if the rotor and stator are in resonance the voltage should keep building at the output, so one should get a much higher output voltage at resonant frequency for a given (fixed) input voltage.

So to use the 50 hz example: If you are pulsing the rotor 5volts @ 50 hz then in theory you should find that at 3000 rpm the output voltage should be highest? Honestly I have no clue as this can only be tested benchtop.

Just divide the rpm of that the alternator is rotating by 60, and it will give you the stator output frequency in hz.



hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #83 on: April 07, 2008, 02:32:13 am »
YES MAN! when the alternator hits resonance you can Pull Enough power to power the fuel cell from the Resonating Alternator...

The problem is, there is So much power available, there is Even enough power to Loop the alternaters output around and Fuel its input, rotor.

The problem is, when the cell charges and discharges, and it does, it throws it out of resonance because the amount of power the alternator provides to its own rotor, and this means you have to keep it in tune..

So this is why i chose the External circuit, It is less effecient in gas production and more efficient on the driver motor, but In self resonance Loop mode it kinda torchers the alternator pulling the extra power to run the rotor, so this is why i moved on to an external circuit, you can make it Stay CLose to resonance, and before you had to baby sit it in loop mode.

so i run the outta loop mode for now, it only cost 15 watts to do this but i don't have to babysit the unit. the gas does drop a little, but i feel its worth it not to have to babysit.


when in resonance, the power comming from the stator going back into the rotor is GREAT. but i replaced it with external circuit because i don't like babysitting.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2008, 02:37:53 am by hydrocars »

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #84 on: April 07, 2008, 15:35:01 pm »
I have a doubt about the alternator motor setup.

With the blocking diodes in place there will be no LC resonance between the stator and the WFC.
Therefore won't the output frequency of the stators depend exclusively on the Alternators RPM and not on the load? So if the alternator is constantly spinning at 3600rpm the stator should supply 60hz rectified DC to the WFC regardless of charge discharge cycle of the WFC?

If the rotor is supplied a constant rectified DC supply: 60 hz frequency from house hold 110VAC supply through a variac, and the alternator drive motor is spinning the alternator @ 3600 rpm, regardless of the load shouldnt the alternator be in constant resonance?

Although Hydro I agree that you can take the output from the stator and feed it back to the rotor, wont the combined output of the stators be rippled DC and not pulsed DC in which case the resonance effect will be limited?

Does the rpm of the motor change with the load (WFC) on the stator output without any external input. In otherwords suppose I were to attach a 10 cell load to the alternator output and the altenrator is spinning steadily at 3600rpm....does this speed change by itself once the load is attached?



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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #85 on: April 08, 2008, 02:25:31 am »
(http://www.angelfire.com/wi3/jeffknepper53177/gen5.JPG)

Why does it say it needs 160amps input power?

hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #86 on: April 08, 2008, 03:38:21 am »
That means it Can draw 160 amps from the car battery.... Its cool.

I have a DC motor that says 12 volts 60 amps on the side.... SO, what this means is It Can Draw 60 amps, this dont mean it will... On idel it draws 13 amps. when you applie load to it it starts drawing more amps depending on the load, but it should draw no more than 60 and if you torq it harder than that you will burn it up..


So, the gernator can Draw 160 amps, it may be only 12 amps on idel, so you run a radio from the converter it could then pull 14 amps, you run a shop light it could then pull 30 amps, etc,,, it can pull as much as 160 amps. so if it is taking 1900 watts full power then this means you can run about a 1900 watt driver motor.

THis does not mean you have to use a 1900 watt motor and pull 160 amps, you can use a smaller motor and pull fewer amps, but i have to admit, 1900 is alot, by driver motor is very incificient and it pulls about 1400 to 2800 watts, depending on the load, 230 or 220 volt motors clearly has more torq and draws less power, so they're ideal..

EDIT,, i just noticed it said that the output was 1600 watts,,, i guess this means when your consuming 1600 watts from the converter its using 160 amps from the battery...  there is a 300 watt loss from heat etc,,.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2008, 03:44:39 am by hydrocars »

hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #87 on: April 08, 2008, 03:41:52 am »
i dont think that rotory converter is very efficient, this is why you use a 12 volt to 220 converter and not 120 or 104... 220 is the way to go~!