Author Topic: How Stanly Powered His alternator  (Read 50822 times)

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hydro

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #72 on: April 05, 2008, 11:05:24 am »
yes, but again thats not what he used to run the car, he used well over 40 amps.

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #73 on: April 05, 2008, 15:21:31 pm »
well,

We don not know that for sure, yet.
If i look at seriecells, then they produce 2 ltrs per minute with 20 amps by 12v



lots of thinking to do

steve

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #74 on: April 05, 2008, 21:30:20 pm »
Does any body know where to get a high frequency variac?

Most variacs handle only 60hz,  though I did find some that can handle 2000hz but only with limited current.

Stans rotary pulse votlage frequency generator looks like an off the shelf metered variac that has been modified, http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=metered+variac&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi

I really want to test connecting the stator output to an AC variac and then to the rotor, but  how do you provide the initial power and are there high frequency variacs?


Also I would really like to analyze the pics posted by passion. There are some major discrepancies in the schematic for the rotary pulse voltage frequency generator pics.

The input is 60 hz which is then rectified so the rotor input will always be 60hz pulsed DC?

However in his photos stan has labelled the unit to take only 110Volt DC input.

The question really now is has any body tried using something like a variac which doesnt kill the stator output frequency which i believe the capacitor that hydro originally tried does kill...it smoothes it out, so i doubt you could have actually achieved resonating alternator.

How does one know the alternator is resonating?  in other words what are the benchmarks for a self resonating alternator?

(That is stator output frequency is also the rotor  input frequency regardless whether its a feed back loop or external pwm to pulse the  rotor)

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #75 on: April 05, 2008, 22:17:42 pm »
Hi Kat,


Where did you read that you need a high frequency Variac?
The drawing is very specific about that it is a 60hz Variac.

br
steve

Tommy

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #76 on: April 06, 2008, 16:24:09 pm »
Has anyone actually tried what that schematic implies? It goes hand in hand with a Canadian Patent that Stan has that I mentioned the other night. I could be wrong, but follow my thinking here.

We always assume to use a 12 volt alternator because that is what we know. But what does that alternator do? It takes a DC input and generates a 3 phase AC output right? We just assume to use 12 or 24 volts because that is what our batteries come in. OK, next

Stan used a 12 volt DC to 120 or 240 AC generator on his buggy right? Couldn't it be a 120 generator that in-turn fed through the variac to vary the voltage between 110 and say 5 volts, which was then rectified as the drawing suggests and sent through the rotor of the alternator? That is what the drawing says.

So if we send 100 volts DC into the rotor what do we get out of the alternator? Should be 100VAC 3 phase that goes through diodes and becomes DC. The secret is that the alternator puts harmonics into play which aids in disassociating the water molecule. Now when we start this thing up and slam 100VDC into the cell I'd imagine it would start to rumble real fast no? Then once it starts rolling we back the variac off to say 5 volts at 2 amps to continue the process. Or as Stan says in the video, "we simply adjust the voltage as needed to match the demand".

I've been thinking of this for some time but am unable to afford to buy the needed equipment to try it. Would someone be game to try it? If I'm wrong I'm wrong, but if I'm right and it's that simple, how cool would that be???

I am really excited to see what happens and if no one wants to try it, I will figure out a way to do it, just let me know.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2008, 16:35:35 pm by Tommy »

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #77 on: April 06, 2008, 16:38:08 pm »
Hi Kat,


Where did you read that you need a high frequency Variac?
The drawing is very specific about that it is a 60hz Variac.

br
steve

Hi stevie

Well if its only 60hz and its fixed then the alternator will have to spin only at 3600 rpm (converting 60hz to revolutions per minute) for the stator and rotor to be in resonance.

If the alternator slightly deviates from 3600 rpm there is no resonance. The other frequencies you will have  to try for resonance will be harmonic which means 7200 rpm and so on...

Another  way to match the rotor with the stator is to take the output of the stator and feed it back to the rotor through a variac.

But 60Hz strictly implies you have to have the alternator at 3600 rpm for it to be in resonance (rotor input and stator output @60hz)

I still think a Lawton PWM will allow gating, once high voltages are reached and therefore better suited for replicating stans set up.


Stevie and anyone with an alternator motor can you please source a 110 60Hz volt ac variac, rectify the output using a bridge rectifier and connect it to the rotor. Next make sure your alternator is spinning at 3600rpm and lets see if we get any gas production, by increasing the stator output voltage as stan does in his it runs on water video. At 3600 rpm the alternator should be in resonance at 60hz.

This is a simple and easy way to test the schematic.   

Tommy

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #78 on: April 06, 2008, 17:09:48 pm »
Oops, to correct my earlier post.

I did not mean ...couldn't it be a 120 volt generator...what I meant was couldn't he have taken 120 volts from the generator.

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Re: How Stanly Powered His alternator
« Reply #79 on: April 06, 2008, 22:36:02 pm »


So if we send 100 volts DC into the rotor what do we get out of the alternator? Should be 100VAC 3 phase that goes through diodes and becomes DC. The secret is that the alternator puts harmonics into play which aids in disassociating the water molecule. Now when we start this thing up and slam 100VDC into the cell I'd imagine it would start to rumble real fast no? Then once it starts rolling we back the variac off to say 5 volts at 2 amps to continue the process. Or as Stan says in the video, "we simply adjust the voltage as needed to match the demand".


Tommy,

As soon as you rais the voltage higher then 30 volts, your rotor is so strong, that the drivermotor cannot turn it anymore.
Hopes this answers your question.
I know this by testing....

br
Steve