Author Topic: Exciting water mist  (Read 7183 times)

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2012, 11:46:32 am »
Look familiar? See attached pic or the link someone else copied and uploaded to the cloud...
(http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y320/h2opower/EXAMPLEOFLASERSETUPOFMEYER.png)

Who did publish this?


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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2012, 11:48:48 am »
The whole problem i see here, is that you put HV on two electrodes in a hydrogen rich environment.
PLEASE DONT DO THIS AT HOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The mixture will explode in yr face, if you are not lucky.

Steve

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2012, 13:34:25 pm »
Wow look at that. What was Stan using this light for?

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2012, 15:19:28 pm »
Hydrogen can be dangerous, but if we filled a tube with it and ignited it, the gas would just burn, not explode. Now if the tube was closed, the hydrogen would be isolated from oxygen. I don't think an arc inside the closed tube could do anything more then ionize the hydrogen

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2012, 15:24:29 pm »
Pure hydrogen ok, ll gues, but hho?

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2012, 17:51:45 pm »
Dave, I'm assuming the reason the glowing tube of water vapor was used, was to ultimately show how to find which gases were present by looking at the frequencies of light radiated from the tube. Correct? In other words, a simple demonstration of a spectroscopy test?

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2012, 19:13:00 pm »
Dave, I'm assuming the reason the glowing tube of water vapor was used, was to ultimately show how to find which gases were present by looking at the frequencies of light radiated from the tube. Correct? In other words, a simple demonstration of a spectroscopy test?

Yup, the water mist was practice but we had a bunch of unknowns. We looked at the emission lines with a spectroscope and then looked up the unknown substance in reference books.

 
Pure hydrogen ok, ll gues, but hho?

yeah, hho would be relatively dangerous in a closed tube under this condition. 

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Re: Exciting water mist
« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2012, 21:15:42 pm »
Dave, do you recall which substances showed on the spectrograph? Didn't Hydrogen and Oxygen both show up in the results?