Author Topic: The effect of the electric field to the water molecule  (Read 6680 times)

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Re: The effect of the electric field to the water molecule
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2012, 23:03:38 pm »
You got my attention, webmug.

Thats what Stan said. 180 degrees out of phase and the wfc acting as a resistor in the LCR resonating circuit.
With a bifilar coil, you also have capacitance of the two wires in parallel.

So you think you can get a 90 plus 90 degrees out of the two chokes?

Steve

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Re: The effect of the electric field to the water molecule
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2012, 11:15:57 am »
I will only know for sure if my theory is correct when and if it works... Concerning what stan said i think i remember he talking that he was applying to the water the electric fields in 90° before the current so leading current... Which i guess is the case with my theory, since the collapse is creating a second pulse with open circuit.

He stated that he used the electric fields in a manner as if it were potential energy, just like a gravity field... Did anyone tried to add a coil in parallel with the cell? This is the only way it could become a resonant circuit in which at resonance the current instead of raising it drops...

It would provide a discharge path for the ions since Dc has no impedance... if this coil is pulse together i guess it could be even better in restricting the dc amps... I think it would prevent the screening of the electric field by the ions...

Webmug, is strange that phase angles for the water... the phase angle will depend on the frequency... but i guess you need a resistive network to be able to properly measure it... and at resonance it should at least approach 90° or close to... 

Again i don't know how you did it, but what i would do if i had an oscilloscope is this: use two oscilloscope probes to measure the voltage across the capacitor and the voltage across a resistor connected in series. Than feed with ac... I guess theres a special function at the oscilloscope to measure the phase angles than... Than you need to vary the frequency, the resistor, the voltage, measure the currents in all cases applied and plot a graph with your results... comparing the resistance to dc, impedance to ac... some can be learned from that...


In phasors diagrams you can understand the phase relation according to the capacitive resistive and inductive elements in a circuit...  So its frequency dependent... The higher the Q factor the closer it can get to 90°... the higher the frequency the higher is the Q since the faradaic conduction is what is limiting the Q, so the smaller is the XC the greater is the Q...

What is bad about faradaic ac conduction is that it makes only half electrolysis and than it makes the contrary effect...

I mean did anyone ever tried to add a coil in parallel with the cell?

I would not be surprised if this is the coil that sets the frequency with a moveable wiper arm... Why, to accommodate the contaminants on the water... Since different water impurities concentration would change ion transit time...

Stan mentioned it would self oscillate until there still water in the cell, he meant a cell, cell, so if resonance is concerned, since we provide such a frequency that the ions can discharge into the resonating coil, 90° after the peak in electric field.. mean theres transit time for them to be separated... this discharge can be cooperative, meaning its indeed work as a cell, inputing electrical energy into the system... so far if a threshold is achieved it would sustain self oscillation..

I guess faxst freddy was doing this...   
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 13:35:54 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The effect of the electric field to the water molecule
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2012, 12:00:55 pm »
Is there anyone in Puerto Rico?

Regarding the restriction of current thru the resistance of the wire, its related to the fact that during the collapse of the field, as the current just wants to start to flow it immediately create an equal and opposite voltage, so in that case what happens is the higher is the resistance the greater will be this voltage developed at the resistance for a given current flowing, at secondary coil for example such that the collapsed voltage is of a greater intensity...

I mean, if the wire is resistive in all coils the voltage developed by the current is subtracted to the collapsed voltage

The fracture cell patent says that stans patents although it really work fails in this amp restriction technics because it adds too much complexity... and is expensive according to them...
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 13:57:08 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The effect of the electric field to the water molecule
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2012, 19:42:29 pm »
I think we are looking in the wrong direction about the restriction of current!

Why did Stan use the adjustable symbol for the negative inductor? Yes, we know to adjust the equal but opposite voltages...

Question:
What happens when inductor current is almost 90 deg for chokes and if one choke is connected opposite polarity in respect to the voltages?
What if the phase is unequal and equal respect to each other and has this an restricting effect on current using the magnetic field in the UU-core of the VIC.

Regards!

Hey webmug, i guess the coils on the transformer core are not accounted for their impedance only for their resistance, as stans equations for impedance shows. Thats because during pulse on it is a voltage source. I'm not sure about that because i know for generators the impedance of the coils should be added quadratically too. I believe in transformers this impedance can be the small coupling leakage.. As they are voltage opposites, subjected to same pulse they simply subtract and their resistance  sums in series... anyway theres still some inductance that could be accounted i would guess... The other impedances are the coils out of the pulsing core..