Author Topic: The opposite side of primary coil...  (Read 1929 times)

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The opposite side of primary coil...
« on: August 30, 2012, 19:42:17 pm »
Cell Driver Circuit (90)
In either case, the resultant or varied pulse train (47a xxx 47n) (calibration of 44a xxx 44n) becomes incoming gated pulse signal (48) of figure (3-5) to cell driver circuit (90) of Figure (3-5) which performs a switching function by switching "off' and "on" electric ground being applied to opposite side (48) of primary coil (26) of Figure (3-19). The resultant pulse wave form (49a xxx 49n) of Figure (3-18) superimposed onto primary coil (26) is exact duplicate of proportional pulse train (47a xxx 47n). However, each pulse train (47) (49) are electrically isolated from each other. Only voltage cross-over from regulated power supply (150) of Figure (3-6) to battery supply (28) occurs, as illustrated in Figure (3-6).


These controlled and variable pulse features are, now, translated to Resonant Charging pulse train (65a xxx 65n) of Figure (3-21) via Unipolar pulse train (64a xxx 64n) of Figure (3-20) during Resonant Action (160) of Figure (3-26) when signal coupling is applied across Resonant Cavity (170) of Figure (3-24) via positive voltage zone (66).
Negative electrical voltage potential (61) of pulse wave (65a xxx 65n) of Figure (3-21) is simultaneously applied to negative voltage zone (67) via Resonant Charging Choke (62) of Figure (3- 22) which is electrically linked to opposite end of Primary Coil (26). The resultant signal coupling ( 65a xx 65n ) of Figure (3-21) is accomplished since primary coil (26), pulsing core (53), secondary coil (52), switching diode (55), resonant charging choke (56), resonant cavity assembly (170), natural water (68), and variable resonant charging choke (62) forms Voltage Intensifier Circuit (60) of Figure (3-22), as illustrated in Figure (3-22) as to Figure (3-23). Negative electrical ground (61) of voltage Intensifier circuit (60) of Figure (3-22) is electrically isolated from primary electricaI ground (48) of Figure (3-22).
Pulsing transformer (26/52) of Figure (3-22) steps up voltage amplitude or voltage potential (VO xxx Vn) of Figure (3-19) during pulsing operations. Primary coil (26) is electrically isolated (no electrical connection between primary _26 and secondary coil ~ to form Voltage Intensifier Circuit (60) of Figure (3-22). Voltage amplitude or voltage potential (Vo xxx Vn) is increased when secondary coil (52) is wrapped with more turns of wire. Isolated electrical ground (61) prevents electron flow from input circuit ground (48).
Switching diode (55) of Figure (3-22) not only acts as a blocking diode by preventing electrical "shorting" to secondary coil (52) during pulse off-time (69) of Figure (3-20) since diode (55) "only" conducts electrical energy in the direction of schematic arrow; but, also, and at the same time functions as a electronic switch which opens electrical circuit (60) during pulse offtime ... allowing magnetic fields of both inductor coils (56/57) to collapse ... forming pulse train (64a xxx 64n).
Resonant charging choke (56) in series with Excitor-Array (160) of Figure (25) forms an inductor-capacitor circuit (180) of Figure (3-28) since Excitor-Array (66/67) acts and performs as an capacitor (dielectric liquid between opposite electrical plates) during pulsing operations. The dielectric properties (insulator to the flow of amps) of natural water (68) of Figure (3-28) as to Figure (3-26) (dielectric constant of water being 78.54 @ 20C in 1-atm pressure) between electrical plates (66/67) forms capacitor (57) , as illustrated in (170) of Figure (3-25). Water now becomes part of Voltage Intensifier circuit in the form of "resistance" between electrical ground (67) and pulse- frequency positive potential (66) ... helping to prevent electron flow within pulsing circuit (60) of Figure (3-22).
Inductor (56) and capacitor (57) properties of LC circuit (180) is therefore "tuned" to resonant at a given frequency. Resonant frequency (63) of Figure (3-19) can be raised or lowered by changing the inductance (56) and/or capacitance (57) valves. The established resonant frequency is, of course, independent of voltage amplitude, as illustrated in Figure (3-21) as to Figure (3-18). The value of inductor (56), value of capacitor (57), and the pulse-frequency (63) of voltage (Yo xxx Vn) being applied across the LC circuit determined the impedance of LC circuit (Figure 3-28).
The impedance of inductor (56) and capacitor (57) in series, Z series is given by



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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2012, 19:54:04 pm »
If the choke is connected to the positive side of the primary coil the energy in the primary will add up with the rest of the circuit to discharge into the cell instead of into the switch killing it...

You see? this is an improvement that he only mentioned but never made any drawing about it...

Another improvement i see possible is to apply ac at the same frequency that will be pulsed to the primary so that the switch act like a active rectifier an thereto there will be less stress to it since the source voltage won't sum with the kickback voltage across the primary... it will instead subtract,,,

So what i said in the last regard is that you use two transformers one working with a H bridge and the output of this feed the primary of the vic being pulsed at the same frequency but only with one switch... well pulsed...

or just an H bridge followed by diode and a mosfet for example...


I think is the only way to achieve really high power at high efficiencies...

« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 21:22:31 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2012, 21:08:23 pm »
_Check this out:

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2502.0;attach=11445)

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2502.0;attach=11447)

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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2012, 22:24:58 pm »
Quote
which is electrically linked to opposite end of Primary Coil

Is this not a typo error? Should it be secondary opposite end?
If not negative side secondary coil is open.

Regards

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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2012, 22:52:43 pm »
actually is not open... its connected thru the primary to the circuit... the primary will sum with the choke... as the secondary is also connected to the primary.. in this case...

Its wrote in the same manner twice in the tech brief and in one of the patents,,, seems contradictory since later in the document he states its isolated from circuit ground,,, well maybe not all times...

he even reinforce primary (26)

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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2012, 22:57:36 pm »
What is the patent where he also wrote this?

Thanks!

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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2012, 02:52:27 am »

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Re: The opposite side of primary coil...
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2012, 05:23:27 am »
sorry i think it wasn't that patent..