Author Topic: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling  (Read 37016 times)

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Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« on: August 08, 2012, 15:23:28 pm »
I believe stan managed the time constant around the circuit to develop electrical stress of short duration and high intensity to do exactly what he said break the molecule apart.

The mystery of the frequency doubling in the vic coil will be revealed now:

Its well known to all that an inductor when connected to a source develops an exactly opposite polarity of that of the source at the instant it is contacted to the source. This mean that at this instant zero current flow and the voltage is maximum across the inductor. This voltage is a consequence of and infinitely small amount of current changing infinitely abruptly in time. As time goes this rate of change becomes lower and so a current start to raise according to differential of voltage between inductor and source. The time constant of the LR circuit is the time it takes for this voltage to change to 0 and current goes to maximum.

Remember now that stan said that he only used potential, no "current" but to develop potential some current may however flow.

The time constant of a LR circuit is =L/R

Stan mentioned the resistive values of the coils because he wanted to highlight this.

Coming back to the time varying current at the inductor, when it reaches the max current its induced back emf is 0 so its fully charged with magnetism. If the source is disconnected this field will collapse. 
 
Now what is field collapse?

When you apply a dc voltage to a coil a current start to flow varying with time up to a point where its maximum, during this increase in magnetic field you can imagine at first the magnetic field lines starting in the middle of the coil than starting to get bigger and bigger...

The field collapses is when you get the magnetic field decreased all in once.

I explained first that an inductor creates an opposite voltage as it is connected to a dc source and this decay with time following the time constant allowing current to start to flow. Did you noticed that as the magnetic field increase this voltage decrease with time?

Ok

Now if the coil is disconnected to the source having a resistor across it, the magnetic field should reduce in time and it now must create voltage of reversed polarity however theory says that the magnetic polarity won't flip. 

For those who might didn't grasp it.

The frequency doubles, in stan design because when the pulse is on, the secondary sends a pulse to the thru coils, and when the pulse is off, the field collapses and the chokes apply another pulse to the cell of the same polarity.

The cell is a discontinuity capacitance.

The amp restriction is evident now.

 


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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2012, 15:36:03 pm »
So, if the collaps time of the coil is the same as the pulse who charged it, you will have a double puls.
That part is clear to me.
What is the gain in this?
It takes a charge to charg up the coil...

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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2012, 15:51:28 pm »
Hello Steve,

I was trying to explain that when a dc source is connected to a coil the field increase in time (current flow increase) and the induced emf decreases in time allowing current to flow. Source voltage and BEMF cancel.

Similarly if the current is now decreased by reducing source voltage in time the induced emf reinforce the source voltage so it sums with BEMF to ensure same current still going. Thats why an inductor is used to take filter DC.

An inductor fight changes in current with a voltage knife.

This word collapse mean abrupt change. If instead of decreasing the current we than collapses the field we create a fast high intensity voltage pulse the knife. 

The intensity being high enough will bang the water.

Its a cascading effect and can only be initiated at high power levels this don't mean it must have long duration.




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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2012, 16:11:19 pm »
Hi,

Problem is that the VIC uses AC (from secondary on resonance).

Can you explain this scope shot what I took?

The secondary lead B+ and B- are connected to two scope channels A en B. Look what the voltage is on both channels. A-B is also visible.
The secondary is on SRF (self resonance frequency). Primary was pulsed 50% square wave 12V. They are 180 out of phase????? Scope channels are not inverted.

What happens when you connect a choke at B- and/or B+ tuned on this frequency? Give more voltage right?

Br,
Webmug

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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2012, 16:19:16 pm »
Webmug,

This means that you are measuring in reference to ground and at the moment one side of the secondary is positive the other is negative and vice versa...

Br
sebosfato

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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2012, 16:22:15 pm »
Ok, but I use two identical probes, why are the voltages not equal but opposite?
Probe GND  lead are connected, but not to any coils.

Br,
Webmug

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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2012, 16:26:44 pm »
Well thats because each side of the secondary has a different polarity.

If i understood well there is connected b+ to the A channel an b- to B channel and the negative side of the probes to a common ground. Isn't?

You are measuring relative to zero volts... so they will seem 180° apart... because they are, equal and opposite in magnitude...

Br
sebosfato



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Re: Amp restriction mechanism frequency doubling
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2012, 16:31:33 pm »
Well thats because each side of the secondary has a different polarity.

If i understood well there is connected b+ to the A channel an b- to B channel and the negative side of the probes to a common ground. Isn't?

Br
sebosfato

Yes, correct!

The reason I find this interesting is that Stan mentions "isolated gnd" on the neg side of the secondary coil.
If you connect the gnd (scope probe) the voltage is zero at B-, but the frequency SRF is changed and B+ has approx 500V AC.

The gnd is a electron source and this is what Stans said to prevent electron source and named it "isolated gnd" and the secondary can swing on both sides instead of B+ only.

Br,
Webmug