Author Topic: Hydrogen gas gun project  (Read 5660 times)

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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2012, 14:26:00 pm »
You becarefull....
Dont blow yr self up.

I trully hope you see some different colors in the flame during the test.

Steve

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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2012, 05:48:41 am »
Thanks Steve. i will be careful.

Sorry for not posting in so long. Being in school sort of makes an unstable environment for me. I'm happy to report i'm finally gaining valuable skills in my physics and chem classes. At the moment I am starting the process of applying to grad school so free time to work on projects will be limited. i'll always be back to catch up and post so don't think i've given up.  I stopped posting on this topic because I am not happy with my electrodes. I'm still thinking about the best design.

Ok, now for the really deal, I have been talking to my chem professor about the injector concepts and he thinks it would be possible to break down h20 if we removed enough electrons. Not just into h2 and O2 but a complete breakdown. I will post more info of our further conversations. 

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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2012, 07:33:49 am »
chrome://newtabhttp//www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tis4CBKOJ8s&list=UUDk1TaaIv-N3IKaNZh5T1GQ&index=2&feature=plcp

This is a video of my latest test. Nothing special to report put fun all the same.

My way to test for positive ions in simple. (Please watch the video before reading more). The energy i provide from the photon energy and the electric fields should change the arc in a significant way if i actually make positive ions. The energy input should be somewhat relative to the output

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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2012, 10:16:25 am »
chrome://newtabhttp//www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tis4CBKOJ8s&list=UUDk1TaaIv-N3IKaNZh5T1GQ&index=2&feature=plcp

This is a video of my latest test. Nothing special to report put fun all the same.

My way to test for positive ions in simple. (Please watch the video before reading more). The energy i provide from the photon energy and the electric fields should change the arc in a significant way if i actually make positive ions. The energy input should be somewhat relative to the output

Great test, Dave!
So you tried to use just ambient air thru a sparkgap?
Great video, btw.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tis4CBKOJ8s&list=UUDk1TaaIv-N3IKaNZh5T1GQ&index=2&feature=plcp
(thats the real link... :) )




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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2012, 02:01:51 am »
Thanks Steve!

yeah, just air.

And thanks for posting the correct link! haha 

On a forum, maybe this one, someone posted that as you apply an electric field to a substance, the absorption spectrum changes and the molecules can absorb a higher less powerful wavelength. Do you think this is true?

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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2012, 06:43:49 am »
I have come to a few conclusions since I last posted. Looking at Stans gas gun design, it seems as if its a pour attempt at an ionizer. We know that air ionizer need sharp points and uses one static polarity to ionize the air. In the gas gun situation, the classic air ionizer will not work well. This is because they produce ions by accelerating electrons and ions which are already in the air. These free electrons collide with gas atoms to produce ions.  In a closed container, we will be limited in the effect that can be produced because of the small amount of free electrons relative to the gas we are trying to ionize.

Because of the situation, I believe it is necessary to have two plates. When a high potential is applied, the orbitals are elongated which means a much lower photon energy is necessary for ejecting electrons. This would explain Stans choice of leds. ( see tunnel ionization)

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Re: Hydrogen gas gun project
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2012, 06:04:44 am »
I bought this high voltage supply for testing off ebay

www.ebay.com/itm/100kV-high-voltage-adjustable-power-supply-tesla-coil-resonant-/310550049025?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item484e39b101

The unit was described as dc output and could be adjusted from 0 to 100kv. It included the schematics when it arrived. One quick look was all it took to make me skeptical of the dc output. The line current was rectified and had a few other things going on but then was fed into a transformer which produces the high voltage. No rectification was present after the transformer. I hooked it up and check with my high voltage dc probe. Nothing!. It produces a nice arc but I'm pretty sure its just putting out ac which i will need to rectify.

It real cold here but hopefully i can perform some ionization tests this week  :)