Author Topic: Figuring out the Steam Resonator  (Read 43996 times)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #80 on: February 12, 2012, 04:58:34 am »
This is the layout of my circuit.
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/steam_resonator_circuit.PNG)

Heres the PDF of the circuit, if you want to build it.
http://www.globalkast.com/docs/Alternating_DC_Pulse_Generator_with_LED.pdf

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #81 on: February 12, 2012, 06:16:26 am »
Wow, thanks for that info.
The waveform I get is channel A is on 4x as long as channel B.
At least it does alternate now though.
I still do not get anything happening at the cell though.
Right now I am so frustrated I think the only way to get the water to do anything is to drive two 40kv flyback transformers on and off and shock the water with it.
I'm sure that may cause an effect of some type ;)

All the other things I have tried have failed, and I think the voltage just isn't enough.
What kind of transformer are you using - a step-up?
I used a primary of approx. 600 turns to a secondary of 3500 turns - no effect.
I also tried a primary of approx. 600T and secondary of 5500 turns - no effect.
I also tried with and without a diode on the secondary - no effect.
It's no wonder most people say this is all bunk - so far, it appears to be.
The average experimenter would have given up on all this decades ago.
If only we had Stan's devices to examine...

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #82 on: February 12, 2012, 06:22:52 am »
I think that's because it's like what Steve Meyer said "It's a tuned system". If a single one of the many different parameters of the circuit are not correct it will not work....At least for the VIC and resonant cavity....Not sure if the steam resonator is the same. The use of the driving circuitry of the steam resonator coil being identical to the resonant cavity driving circuitry seems to suggest it.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #83 on: February 12, 2012, 06:36:38 am »
You may be right, and if that's the case, we have no hope of ever getting it to work - without having Stan's original devices to replicate.
If it's that specific, we will be burning oil for the next 200 years.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #84 on: February 12, 2012, 07:07:45 am »
I think we will figure it out eventually, but it will take a team effort.
We have made many strides on this forum thanks to everyone's contributions.


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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #85 on: February 12, 2012, 17:27:05 pm »
Thanks for the input everyone, although the circuits look great on paper, in reality all you get is a VERY hot 7805 regulator.
Perhaps I need to use other signal generators for the circuit.
It does NOT like 555 timer inputs, I know that - even if powered at 5V.
Atached is the 555 square wave generator I was using (2 of them).
If you run the circuit with no signal inputs, the two 220 ohm resistors on the TIP120s burn up.
Add two 555 signal generators and the 220 resistors burn up along with the 7805 regulator.
I feel like taking the picture tube out of a tv and putting a water cell in its place just to get even with the water!!
Perhaps that is not a bad idea after all ;)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #86 on: February 12, 2012, 18:12:21 pm »
As I was searching the net for scientific papers on water oscillation I came across 2 patents in which coencentric stainless steel tubes have an oscillating frequency passing through them to heat water....Looks like these poeple were using the same methods as Meyer was to heat water.

Attached are the two patents....Only a quick read will reveal that these patents used the same tech as Meyer to heat water....Further study opens up questions on ion-drag as a way to heat dielectric materials (water) using a low frequency oscillating source.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric_heating
(Read the part on the Mechanism)

Here's a quote from the first patent I attached from the "Summary of the invention"

Quote
The chamber has an inner stainless steel tube about which the water flows. Surrounding both the inner stainless steel tube and the flowing water is an outer stainless steel tube. The two coencentric stainless steel tubes are used as electrodes that are connected to a source of electrical oscillations. As the water passes between the two stainless steel tubes, these electrical oscillations are impresses upon the flowing water so that the water may be heated.

Enjoy Everyone

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #87 on: February 12, 2012, 18:32:05 pm »
HMS:
Nice find - although from the patents it mentions dissolved metals in the water.
They may be using some kind of electrolysis, which is worthless for our purposes (at least mine).


Tony:
I scrapped the 555 signal generator crap I had and came up with this circuit to generate the alternating pulses.
It generates a nice clean signal on the scope, but still fails to drive your steam resonator board properly.
Perhaps there needs to be an interface between the two circuits?
What did you use to drive the circuit when it worked for you? - Perhaps you said something nice to it for it to work?
The scope is set to 5V / div.
I have also breadboarded Stan's steam resonator patents numerous times, failing on all of them.
He could have 'happened' to leave things out to keep us from getting it I think...

What am I doing wrong?
My cell and vic are also shown below.
Obviously, the top alligator clip it not stainless, but the pipe is.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2012, 18:50:49 pm by waterfreak »