Author Topic: Figuring out the Steam Resonator  (Read 43990 times)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2012, 06:37:15 am »
Yea, the thing about that item with the bridge is that it's not from the early stuff. He shows a multi tapped transformer in some of the patents as an input before the opto pulsing part of the circuit. It's not from those early patented systems. It used the same aluminum heat sink as the other VIC cards so it was made around the same time. Also it is heavy gage wire, and we see that by this time he was using 29 gage wire and mentioning 36 gauge wire in the newer patents. So why the high current transformer? Anyway I can't figure out what it's for... Maybe new details will come up in the future.

For the SR, we know his first one on the 1992 dune buggy was two flat plates, the later one was two tubes side by side with slots milled into them all along the length. Both appeared to have the same single VIC as the power source. The crossover circuit for them must be in the big VIC box somewhere.


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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2012, 07:14:53 am »
what is the point to this resonator? what use is it on the car really?

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2012, 07:18:50 am »
The steam resonator prevented the water from freezing. Not sure if the pictures I posted were the one used in th buggy?

Go to youtube and watch this video of someone who has replicated it.


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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2012, 07:21:03 am »
Thank you Hms. We wouldn't want our water to freeze.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2012, 07:32:52 am »
lol

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2012, 16:21:19 pm »
HMS-776,
That picture you posted with all the coil packs and white container is the resonace cavity, which has the 11 resonance cells in it.It's not the steam resonator.
Don

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2012, 16:54:42 pm »
Yeah I know, but one of the cells inside it was a steam reasonator, and the VIC used for it I thought was the card on the back left of that picture?

Gotta keep the cell water from freezing also.

BTW Don, the pics you gave us of the inside of the res cavity, I think the steam resonator tube is the shiny one, it's the only one that's been cleaned by the steam! Unless that tube was never connected to anything I think it was the steam resonator.

(http://i642.photobucket.com/albums/uu141/Hms-776/rescavity3.png)
« Last Edit: January 22, 2012, 17:11:52 pm by HMS-776 »

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2012, 17:04:54 pm »
I think he meant the upper two cards in the pic (left of the WFC).
I also think that they probably really are part of the Steam resonator. But what happened to it? It really looks like it has been slaughtered (all the cable connections cut). So from the pic posted in the beginning of this thread there's not much informations anymore available of how this thing was interconnected.

Far more information one can get from the pic of the Home Heating Unit.
Here's the Steam-Resonator Driving Circuit of it:
(http://img259.imageshack.us/img259/4135/steamresonatordrivingbo.jpg)

I just shortly drew the interesting connections (as the Transistor's pre-driving circuit isn't really interesting).
So it looks like that:
The computer tells with 4 bits the amplitude of the primary voltage. This is done with the help of a LM317 and an additional Transistor.
Additionally the computer tells the Impulses and which side to drive.
The actual driving circuit is made of 2 PNP transistors (for driving the primaries), and 2 NPN transistors which make a connection to ground (with a diode in series).
So from this one can get the information, that neither of the two available schematic drawings of the Steam-Resonator is really what he used here. IMHO the lower transistors in the never schematic are only needed, if you wanna drive two different Steam resonators at the same time. But in the Home Heating Unit he powered all as one big unit (all tubes in parallel).
What's really interesting is the voltage rating of the transistors. They are only made to withstand 100 Volts. Also the Diodes used are only rated for 100 Volts.
Well for the primary driving circuit this is surely no problem. But the part which connects the Tubes to ground is problematic. Sure, if the transistor is on, all the voltage will drop over the resistor, and the transistor will be fine. But here's the problem: The other Transistor (on the other electrode) is not turned on during this time. This means it would have the full cell voltages on the transistor.
So my conclusion is: Either the Resonator only worked with very low voltages (< 100V) or the Electrode(s) were coated with some insulator.
Or any other ideas, which could yield an explanation for this?
Edit:
Another IMHO interesting detail: The Transistors are not mounted on a heat sink. This actually indicates, that besides the fact that this thing drives this huge Steam-Resonator, not much energy is needed.

@ HMS-776:
No the clean Tube you see in the WFC wasn't connected. The Steam resonator wasn't in there. It was in the water tank.