Author Topic: Figuring out the Steam Resonator  (Read 44040 times)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #72 on: February 09, 2012, 17:46:48 pm »
I have a few ideas of my own based on what info and pics we have seen. I built robots many years ago and to drive the motors I designed H bridges for forward and reverse and used PWM (pulse width modulation) to control the speed, but give full power. I’ll see if I can dig up the circuits I used. If I can get it working, think of this: Take a standard 30 gal electric water heater, build a “Steam Resonator” element to replace the 220 volt element. Hot water using a fraction of the power needs. The only thing I would worry about is leaching of chromium from the stainless. Would run some test before I hooked it into my house. It also would not be a major retrofit to replace my 5 ton propane furnace with a hot water heat system. As for now, I’m just trying to find time to work on the 5 coil VIC stuff.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #73 on: February 09, 2012, 19:34:35 pm »
This is a circuit I built back last year that does the same as the Steam Resonator circuit.

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/Flip-Flop-Circuit.png)

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/Flip-Flop-Circuit-2.png)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #74 on: February 09, 2012, 21:49:15 pm »
" Take a standard 30 gal electric water heater, build a “Steam Resonator” element to replace the 220 volt element. Hot water using a fraction of the power needs. The only thing I would worry about is leaching of chromium from the stainless. Would run some test before I hooked it into my house."

40 plus years ago copper hot water cylinders were made with their own header tank on top of the cylinder - so it is a top up tank and expansion tank - the cylinder is low pressure - no valve venting requied - the only parts requiring servicing are the ballcock in the headertank and the element, inside the cylinder is a coil of copper = which mains pressure water was fed through to heat giving mains pressure hot water - very effective in isolating low/mains pressure and very low maintanence costs.....the same principle applied to the steam resonator using suitable materials effectively eliminates contamination concerns......also means solar collectors can be hooked into the same system.

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a better design for a home heating system
« Reply #75 on: February 10, 2012, 04:02:46 am »
BE CAREFUL...the heater elements are thick wires surrounded by ceramic and enclosed in a copper tube...the voltages are very dangerous and the current is isolated from the water by the ceramic

This is why the tank is not required to be insulated from the earth

BUT if you use stans system you have to use plastic pipe to connect your home to the tank on in and out lines and you have to insulate the tank from people and from the earth ground.

although the voltages wont be very high, they could be and also the voltage in the water causes electrolysis in the house  piping system and corrosion...so you might be better off designing an isolated heater system that then transfers heat from an exchange coil with heat transfer fins wrapping the stainless piping alongside the plastic piping so that the two liquids are totally isolated from each other both chemically and electrically

a heat exchanger is the way to go

take it from a HVAC engineer...

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #76 on: February 11, 2012, 22:08:10 pm »
Thanks for the info Tony.
It looks good in theory, but in reality that circuit does not work.
The Meyer waveform, I believe, should be channel A on, then both channels off, then channel B on, then both channels off, etc.
When breadboarded, your circuit only produces short spikes which occur at the same time.
Also, shouldn't there be a diode on the secondary of the output coil?
We have to start somewhere - I need to determine the relationship of the two complementary transistor driver circuit.
I think this may hold the key.
We can generate khz square waves quite easily with 555 timers.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #77 on: February 11, 2012, 22:15:41 pm »
@Waterfreak - You must have something wrong, cuz I have built this circuit and it works fine. Here is the signal at the input of the transformer. Remove the R7 & R8 resistors.

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/steam_resonator_pulse.jpg)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #78 on: February 12, 2012, 03:21:56 am »
I have breadboarded it twice, and this is all I get at the output before the transformer.
One channel stays on all the time (or the frequency is too high on one of the sig gens - two 555 timer circuits)
Wouldn't it be easier to use just one sig gen and invert it instead of two?
This circuit's output is not clean at all, very noisy.
Also, you must have used tap water in your test cell and not distilled?
I am using distilled to ensure I get no electrolysis, but cannot get it to do anything.
I do get small bubbles when I use another circuit which puts out around 450VAC (flyback driver circuit)...

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #79 on: February 12, 2012, 04:45:39 am »
not sure why its not working for you, I use distilled water for all my testing. You have to have two signals, one is the resonant frequency signal and the other is the gating signal.