Author Topic: Figuring out the Steam Resonator  (Read 43991 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 99
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2012, 18:06:38 pm »
I've already gotten the 8XA setup to work. I just haven't gotten the VIC circuit to react the same way yet. Back in early January 2011, I got the cell to charge to over 800 volts with 12 volts input @ less than 20mA. It looks like what has to take place is the voltage to the transformer has to be slowly increased from low voltage to its max voltage. This allows a depletion layer to form on the plates, much like a diode/transistor. If you through 12v straight to the transformer it wont allow a depletion layer to form and it will cause a dead short condition. When this depletion layer forms, it blocks current and allows the voltage to build.

there is a post somewhere where a guy says he gets much more gas output when the tubes were first electropolished. The water didnt develop any brown gunk that way... so if the high voltage electropolishing was used to deplete the iron from the surface of the plates so that all that was left was the chromium present in the stainless 316L this would prevent leechoing of the iron into the water...but it also helps with the amp restriction as a barrier like in a transistor at the junction... if you over voltage the electro polishing then you deplete the chromium in the stainless and get to the next layer of iron and in this way you will have no electrodes left... theres a voltage / current limit when electropolishing the waveguides.... we want the end result to be a 98% pure chromium surface...

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 99
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2012, 18:13:58 pm »
remember the zero point energy comes from the INSTANT OFF condition of the signal, components with millisecond rise and fall times are worthless, we need nanosecond response times...very sharp on and off spikes

another point to remember: a sine wave allows the water molecule to flip slowly as it changes phase 180 degrees, but a sharp square wave will SNAP the molecules 180 degrees, thats where the most efficient heating will be found


the resonance is for the inductive / capacitive characteristics of the chokes, each choke has its resonant frequency that restricts amps to a minimum amount of current but allows voltage to pass

the steam resonator is NOT for producing hydrogen... we DO NOT want to separate the water molecule at this point... and also remember that the resonant chamber was placed inside the water tank, so if you heat the water tank the resonant cavity will also be heated... the need for a steam resonator in the resonant cavity is eliminated.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4461
    • water structure and science
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2012, 18:40:48 pm »

another point to remember: a sine wave allows the water molecule to flip slowly as it changes phase 180 degrees, but a sharp square wave will SNAP the molecules 180 degrees, thats where the most efficient heating will be found

Nice theory, Ali, but questionable. Water doesnt react very quick on power on and off.
Take two electrodes and a bucket of water. Turn on the power. It takes at least 3 seconds before you see any reaction. Even when the water already has a charge, it will react slow.
At least, those are my observations....for what it is worth...  ;)



Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 460
    • Global Kast : Water Fuel Cell Research
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2012, 19:18:50 pm »
I went a little off topic here but Im referring to the hydrogen production, not the steam resonator. 

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 238
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #52 on: February 02, 2012, 03:31:09 am »
Back to the steam resonator:

I was studying the driving circuit for the home heating unit and I realized it also has a bridge rectifier like the one used for the dune buggy.
(http://i642.photobucket.com/albums/uu141/Hms-776/123232.png)

Above you'll see the bridge rectifier circled in red, made of individual diodes.
I'm still not sure what purpose it serves through...The input to the rectifier is 24VAC...

« Last Edit: February 02, 2012, 05:55:34 am by HMS-776 »

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 238
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #53 on: February 02, 2012, 06:32:11 am »
The picture I posted last is of the driving circuit, the most important circuit to understand in order to figure out the steam resonator.
Kali_ma_Amar explained this circuit well on page 4 of this topic but there are still a few things I would like to point out, and figure out...

First, the circuit has a bridge rectifier just like the steam resonantor used in the dune buggy. It appears that the rectified output was put through a 12V regulator and a transistor which I think was used to pulse the primary coil in the home heating unit.

Each steam resonator (the home heating unit and the dune buggy) has 2 NPN and 2 PNP transistors.

The steam resonator is not a capacitor, and inductor, or a resistor. I think current is limited by the coil reactance and the high watt resistors only.

(http://i642.photobucket.com/albums/uu141/Hms-776/steamres3.png)

I would like to point out once again using the circuit above that the steam resonator tubes are nothing more than conductive surfaces placed in the water. A current and voltage wave will travel through them, the polarity of the wave depending on the direction of current flow through the conductor. Although there is no voltage build up and a very small voltage drop across the tubes there is still a voltage wave which passes through the tubes. Pulsing this wave back and forth at high speed and switching the direction of the traveling wave is what ultimately causes the water to heat up. I learned when studying transmission lines that voltage waves propogate at the speed of light(1).

(1) Ref http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_14/3.html


Now as far as questions I have is about the coil itself....The dune buggy steam resonator coil has 3 coils (6 wire ends) while the home heating unit looked to have 7 wires coming out of it...Maybe 3 coils, 1 center tap?

So, what I'm wanting to know now is how the coil was designed. I tend to think each had 1 primary coil and 2 secondary coils bifilar wound, but that is a theory I have yet to prove out....

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 460
    • Global Kast : Water Fuel Cell Research
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #54 on: February 02, 2012, 08:35:36 am »
This is one of Stan's transformers, it might have been used for the steam resonator also. You can see written on it the number of turns, 18 T Primary, 360 T, 20:1

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/stanmeyer/Steam_TX.jpg)

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 69
Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #55 on: February 02, 2012, 09:19:11 am »
Above you'll see the bridge rectifier circled in red, made of individual diodes.
I'm still not sure what purpose it serves through...The input to the rectifier is 24VAC...

HI
This bridge is the part of the power source for driving circuit of steam resonator for home heating. In the dune buggy power source is 12 V from accumulator. ( so bridge is for other purpose )
andy