Author Topic: Figuring out the Steam Resonator  (Read 43993 times)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2012, 17:16:30 pm »
I agree, I think the steam resonator did not need high voltages. I think the switching frequency is more important. I do think the high voltage could be used but I don't think it was necessary.
The steam res coil pic posted on the first page has sk3180 transistors which are only 80V transistors.

From the measurements and calculations I've done on that coil it's a got a 1:6 turns ratio. 12V input 72V out.

BTW your right about the home heating unit....Much more information there, thanks for pointing that out.


Edit: I bet the people who bought all of Stan's stuff will be developing the steam resonator units. Hopefully they will get it to market within the next few years. I'm sick of paying 150$ gas bills every month to heat my house! The only problem I see is them getting a patent on it.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2012, 17:39:33 pm by HMS-776 »

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2012, 17:44:03 pm »
Quote
The only problem I see is them getting a patent on it.
Yeah, but that's the good side of it. Stan already patented and described everything. So I don't think anyone can still get any valid patent on it anymore.

BTW: I forgot to answer the question in your first post about whether we think there's a resonance.
I personally think that in this specific usage, the "WFC" does not act like a capacity, as there's only one electrode in usage at any time. Therefore the resonant frequency of the circuit is not dependent on the water properties. And therefore you can work with a fixed one time detected resonance frequency.
But that's just my current guess...

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2012, 17:53:59 pm »
Kali_ma_Amar,

I think your 100% correct on that. The cell is not a capacitor.
Perhaps if any kind of resonance was used it was the resonace of the coil, used for current limiting?

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2012, 19:02:38 pm »
I think he actually wanted to pulse the electrodes. You could either directly pulse them, which would waste a lot of energy, or you could use a resonant circuit where the unused pulse energy gets recycled.
And as in this Steam-Resonator application the "WFC" does not contribute any relevant feature in the circuit (as L,C or R) it is neglectable in relation to the resonant frequency of the circuit. Therefore the resonant frequency in this application is IMHO only dependent on the coil properties.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2012, 01:35:53 am »
I built a circuit back last year that mimics  the Steam Resonator circuit. Here's what the signal looked like at the plates.
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/steam_resonator_pulse.jpg)

I saw in earlier posts where you guys where talking about the FWB rectifier and was thinking that he was using AC as the input. It looks like he was using the FWB with the pulsed DC, he just used this instead of using basic diodes to send the signal to the primary coil. From what I have researched is that the switching of the signals polarity applied to the plates act just like AC. You can test this by connecting 120v AC to you cell and it will cause the water to heat up very fast. Stan's used pulsed DC to accomplish the same feat. It takes less than 1A to heat water up from room temp. to over 220*F. I've tested and done this, in less than 3 mins the was temp. went from room temp. to 220*F.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2012, 03:12:38 am »
Thanks for the update Tony - could this waveform be generated from a simple square wave generator or something? I believe Meyer increased the voltage before sending it to the resonator plates?

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2012, 04:31:51 am »
Yea the simple circuit that used to make the signal above is made by using two input square waves, a gate pulse and the resonant pulse. Stan made the polarity switching take place on the secondary side of the transformer. In my circuit I'm making the polarity switch on the primary side of the transformer, it should give the same results.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2012, 10:41:25 am »
Sure you can heat water just by putting AC on it (this is actually how most cheap air humidifiers work). But the efficiency is just 100%. In this case the water is just used purely as a resistance, and the AC is responsible so that no electrolysis can take place.
But the Steam Resonator IMHO certainly didn't work on that principle, for the energy input was certainly way too small for this huge array to have any considerable heating effect with a low efficiency as 100% ;-)

IMHO, and as Stan described in the technical briefs, the pulses are always one sided, then discharged again, and then pulses are on the other side. I think, and it's also described like that in the briefs, that you could either pulse one side +, then the other side -, or one side +, then the other side +, or - -> -.
As this coil in the first pic only has 3 windings, my guess would be that he used a switch over circuit for the Steam-Resonator in the buggy.

The discharging is IMHO especially very important, when you have different polarities, for otherwise you would get electrolysis (Dr. Stiffler Circuit). If your would use the same polarity for the elctrodes and if the water is more or less isolated, the water would just one time get the charge of the corresponding polarity and couldn't discharge anymore. So also in this case a controlled discharging does make sense (which is IMHO attained with the help of the 2 NPN Transistors).

But that just my current guess. And IMHO as long as noone was able to really replicate the Steam Resonator (and with replication I mean with an OU factor) every idea is as good as the other. So I do definitely not claim that this guess is in any way correct!