Author Topic: Figuring out the Steam Resonator  (Read 43989 times)

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #112 on: February 19, 2012, 21:59:29 pm »
Bubz,

Nice find! It is interesting in that the document refers to frequencies that affect the water molecule.
I believe the steam resonator is not as specific as the resonant cavity unit though, as it only needs to pulse two plates alternately + then - in sequence.
I believe our issues lie in the transformer design. The only ones I know who have been successful are Tony and Don, to some degree.
I am not aware of any others who claim to have the steam resonator working, or to have heated water any other way aside from electrolysis.
I will try augus' circuit and see if I get better results than with Tony's resistor heater!

Augus: Is the 1khz source in your diagram from another external 1khz source or is it the 4047 listed in the circuit?

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #113 on: February 19, 2012, 22:52:21 pm »
The title of this video is misleading, but, what is really being shown is how water can be heated with a resonant cavity and without an alternating electric field.


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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #114 on: February 19, 2012, 22:56:59 pm »
The 1 kHz signal is separate and is just a guess for a starting point. I have not have time to test my circuit and it was drawn from memory of driving motors forward/reverse.

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #115 on: February 20, 2012, 05:51:16 am »
The steam resonator is more complicated than the resonant cell itself. 

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #116 on: February 20, 2012, 07:48:40 am »
Why do you say that Sebosfato?

It seems to me the SM has 3 coils. Primary, secondary, pulse pickup. The pulse pickup coil is used witht the PLL circuit to detect and lock on to the self resonance of the secondary coil. At the secondary coils self resonance it becomes a parallel tank circuit which has a nearly infinite impedance. Rectify the output since the parallel tank creates AC (rectifiers shown at each switching transistor on the home heating unit) and switch the transistors at high speed to change the polarity across the tubes and you heat the water in the same fashion as a microwave.

There's probably more to it than that, as we have discovered about most of Meyer's work but for now that's my understanding.....

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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #117 on: February 20, 2012, 12:53:53 pm »
I'm saying that, because i believe it is kind of a doubled vic so if you can't put a 1 vic to work how think that with 2 it would.

Of course we know stan used 11 vics to put it to work..

The paper accepts any theory, however in the practice the theory is another.

When we understand why meyer says that voltage can perform work in a dead short condition, than we will understand how the steam resonator goes.

I just wanted to point you in the direction stan pointed keep it simple stupid don't make it complicated.
 

 



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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #118 on: February 20, 2012, 14:53:42 pm »
So, in order to think outside the box, we first have to think inside a box?


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Re: Figuring out the Steam Resonator
« Reply #119 on: February 20, 2012, 19:13:00 pm »
So, from what I have learned there are a few ways you can build the steam resonator.
-You can use Tony's circuit which is kinda like a halfbridge driver.
-You can build a fullbridge driver to switch the polarity at the primary coil
-Or you can switch the polarity directly at the resonator.

Switching the polarity at the secondary side (directly at the resonator) gives the most flexibility as this way you can drive the coil at a constant frequency. This way changing the switching frequency will not change the impedance of the coil, and you can switch the polarity as fast as you want. I'm not sure if Meyer used 'Dead time' between switching or if that was why he had those high watt resistors to prevent the short circuit during the swictching overlap. The Tech Brief diagrams do show dead time though. Trying to figure out how to add it to the driving circuit???