Author Topic: Understanding the VIC  (Read 47595 times)

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2011, 23:08:59 pm »
The frequency matched to the gap does have to be a full wavelength frequency, it can be a 3/4 wave, 1/2 wave, 1/4 wave, etc.. Also during current restriction you will not have electrons from the coils crossing the plates, but you will have electrons from the SS plates them self crossing through the water and this will aid in the water splitting. Now as far as the water is concerned, Stan states that water has a dielectric value of approx. 78. This means that 78% of the water bath is non-conductive and the remaining 22% is conductive. Based on tests that I have conducted does prove this to be true. I wont go into full details, but I will tell you this, Stan says he wanted to "tune" into the dielectric properties of water (non-conductive 78%), so basically he wanted to nullify the 22% conductive property of the water bath. Now you have to ask yourself how you can do this!  ;)

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2011, 23:13:55 pm »
Yeah I would think that all those things would apply. It couldnt just be one frequency right? I mean the electronics scan and find resonance in the range they were designed for so it couldn't be. Maybe resonant action can happen in a rang of frequencies. With that said would it not also depend on the voltage force being applied?

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2011, 23:48:00 pm »
The frequency can be harmonics of the frequency used to split the water molecule. Like say if the LC circuit resonates at 5kHz, this would be like the 7th Harmonic of 320kHz.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b1/Waves_in_Box.svg/220px-Waves_in_Box.svg.png)

Yea the voltage force is what causes the electrons from the SS material to be pulled off the surface and also splitting the water. To understand the cell you first need to understand antennas, waveguides and electromagnetism. Once you research this you will see that the the waveguide has to match the coil. Just like the way a radio operates.

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2011, 04:10:12 am »
Well, it's going to be some time before I fully understand all of that. Lots of books to read :)

Thanks Don for pointing me towards that patents, I haven't read that one in a long long time.

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2011, 04:34:19 am »
 :-XDave, you mentioned resonant action earlier.

I think the collision is a major part of all of meyers work, and the resonant action is basically a
threshold point at which dissassociation goes geometrial. Of course the resonant
action does not occur at a specific voltage, it's dependant on a number of factors like
voltage, frequency, leakage current, plate gap etc.

I think it's collision as well as the snapping action which cause disassociation.
That's  why hvdc does not produce a lot of gas. Hydrocars posted a while back
about having successfully putting hvdc across water and only producing
small amounts of gas.

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2011, 11:06:55 am »
does that mean we want resonace at 78 ohms in L1 or 78 ohms in L2 or are those just silly questions?

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2011, 18:06:56 pm »
during current restriction you will not have electrons from the coils crossing the plates, but you will have electrons from the SS plates them self crossing through the water and this will aid in the water splitting.

You got me thinking... it would seem to me that electrons only pass through the water by being carried with an ion. As in a simple electrolysis experiment, the purer the water, the less ion content = little or no gasses.

I have attached two similar experiments for demonstration.
feature=related


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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2011, 21:14:08 pm »
yea when the u get the high voltages across the plates, the high voltages will cause the SS material to release its own electrons into the water and it will aid in the splitting. So the electrons in the water will come from the SS plates and not the circuit itself.