Author Topic: Understanding the VIC  (Read 47630 times)

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #48 on: December 13, 2011, 19:42:52 pm »
Ok Tony,

Before you mentioned that the capacitor has all positive pulses at one side and all negative pulses at the other even though each plate is recieving AC that is 180 out of phase.

 I've been looking into that effect and one person on an EE forum told me that electrolytic capcitors may act like a rectifier if the current through them is restricted....So now that is all I've heard, just searching around trying to find more info on the phenemenon to see if it really exists.

In the mean time I should also say that I got my VIC matrix circuit multisim replication working again, but I need to do more testing to make sure it's a correct replication...I don't want to fill this forum up with disinfo. I am getting the pulse doubling effect from the out of phase AC at each choke. But as we know the water capacitor has some special effects which cannot be replicated, like ionization and incrneased voltage, and maybe even rectification? Also, even though the circuit is at resonance the current is not dropping as it should.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2011, 21:56:34 pm by HMS-776 »

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #49 on: December 13, 2011, 21:30:24 pm »
I succeeded the unipolar pulses. This waveform of the vic sync pulse is not two ac 180° signals is simply a balanced +- outputs. There is a reason for this in the techbrief.

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #50 on: December 13, 2011, 22:15:38 pm »
Sebs, how did you accomplish this?

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2011, 01:29:53 am »
Yea the cell can act like a diode in a way. I discovered this a while back. You can take a test meter and set it to the "Tone" setting which is used to test a short connection in a circuit. Depending on which lead you connect it to, you will get a "Tone" while connected in one configuration while if you connect it the opposite way you not get a "Tone". This shows that the cell can act as a diode in rectifying the signal and can conduct in one direction. Has anybody else tested this?

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #52 on: December 14, 2011, 02:08:07 am »
I simply arranged everything just like stan said, including all parasitic effects of all components.

The unipolar pulses are independent of the frequency. the inputed frequency sets up the train of unipolar pulses...

I simply added a diode in the circuit across the secondary, but connected after the other diode in series...

Well its simply a transient effect so the components must be thought to generate this high frequency harmonics...

thats not all however that is needed to make it to work...

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #53 on: December 14, 2011, 02:27:33 am »
Interesting work, have you gotten a scope shot from the L2 side? Is it still an ac wave form? I kind of think that's what we need to get it to work. Thanks for sharing, I'll try it when I get home, hopefully by then you can tell me what else your doing?


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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #54 on: December 14, 2011, 04:47:01 am »
If the cells polarity switched with each pulse, wouldn't that be equivalent to the steam resonator? In the sales manual Stan states that there is both a static and alternating field being applied to the cell. I don't understand how that one would work?

Yes, I was just about to point that out. In the Steam Resonator circuit, the gate pulses make the transistor switch the polarity on the plate, much like a H-bridge circuit. The voltage acts much like AC, but pulsed in a way to limit current. As you can test with AC voltage, it will not fracture the water but it will heat it up pretty fast. With tests that I have done with 120vac, I was able to super heat the water from room temp. to over 220 degrees in a matter of minutes. Here is a scope shot of what the output of the Steam Resonator pulses should look like.
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/steam_resonator_pulse.jpg)



Am I correct in saying that the steam resonator design still uses a feedback coil and ultimately uses the same drive circuit that the resonant cavity does?
My theory on this is due to the fact that in Stan's steam resonator patents and other diagrams, he makes sure to show that the 'dielectric property of water' has to be tuned into on the steam resonator as well. Would  the only major difference between the resonant cavity coil and the steam resonator coil be that it is missing the chokes? Since we are heating the water and not splitting it? It makes sense to me...

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #55 on: December 14, 2011, 06:27:17 am »
It's a little different than that, chokes are still used for voltage gains and amp restriction, What you need is a high voltage field that switchers polarity. I think there is an array of ways you could produce this effect