Author Topic: Understanding the VIC  (Read 47596 times)

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2011, 20:05:00 pm »
In the water the free electrons will also be the smallest particle, having the least mass, which means they will have the greatest velocity to perform collision ionization!

In one of Stephen Meyer's radio interviews he talked about how the electrons spiral around the wire as they move down the wire. The electrons on a positive conductor will spiral one way, and the electrons in a negative conductor will spiral in the opposite way.
Artinvegas said that Stan had theorized there would exist bidirectional vortexes within the cell which would rip the water mol apart.

It seems like the electrons play a bigger role than we thought previously. I guess as long as your not exchanging electrons then you can take advantage of the physical force of collision without using large amounts of power.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 21:56:29 pm by HMS-776 »

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2011, 22:23:43 pm »
(http://i642.photobucket.com/albums/uu141/Hms-776/reseft.png)

The diagram above shows that each choke coil performs a different function.

The injector VIC has 2 choke coils even though the injector only has 1 connection which connects to the inner electrode, the outer electrode is grounded through the engine.

Tony, Don, and others have mentioned that the VIC resonance is between the positive choke and the cell, and that the negative choke has no effect on resonance. I mentioned in the first post that resonance is the self resonance of the coils, but I think the cell effects resonance because of the antiresonance phenemenon.

Ref: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_6/5.html

So the question I have for everyone now is, what is the purpose of each choke coil and how are they behaving differently?
Stan explains them as performing different functions in the tech brief.

One thing I think is important here is the diode placement. It prevents the AC from the secondary from reaching the positive choke.

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2011, 22:33:11 pm »
when L1 & Cell are in resonance they have "Zero" resistance (XL1 = XCp), but L2 will have a very high resistance to current flow (XL1 = XCp < XL2).

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2011, 23:08:59 pm »
Yup, you can't create voltage across the cell without the L2 choke or with one that is to small. Resonate action also is a effect and I would imagine that it has something to do with L2 being a different size. As Tony has pointed out, it would be sending a different frequency to the cell than the L1. Could this cause resonant action?

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2011, 06:36:59 am »
So, the L1 choke and cell are a series LC resonant circuit. The resonance creates the high voltage, while the L2 choke limits current?

 In a series LC circuit the increased voltage is due to the Q factor which is XL or XC (since both are equal at resonance) divided by R.

If only the L1 choke and cell are in resonance then would the Q factor calculations include the secodary reactance and the L2 choke reactance?

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2011, 06:47:33 am »
Hms, that is exactly what I have found from my experiments, L1 is in resonance and L2 is restricting amp flow. We often think of the Wfc as a capacitor but it only functions as a capacitor because of the Vic. I think the high voltage is created elseware in the circuit, not the series resonance, I mean that wouldnt make sense.  The L2 choke is really something special. With my first Vic set up I messed around with the inductance of the L2 choke a lot. There seems to be perrameters but I could increase the inductance and voltage would also rise.

Ps Alex petty claims to have a proof of concept set up. It's interesting and it is proof of concept in my opinion. What I don't understand is what the difference is about his set up or even in my own set up. I ordered a lot of testing equipment so hopefully I will be able to show you guys some sound data soon
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 07:04:13 am by Dave »

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2011, 06:51:16 am »
That's very interesting.

Especially if the reactance of the secondary and L2 choke are part of the Q calculation. That would mean that thier reactances would increase the voltage magnification of the cirucit, and they would also limit current...

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Re: Understanding the VIC
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2011, 07:27:07 am »
Ps Alex petty claims to have a proof of concept set up. It's interesting and it is proof of concept in my opinion. What I don't understand is what the difference is about his set up or even in my own set up. I ordered a lot of testing equipment so hopefully I will be able to show you guys some sound data soon

Are you referring to the youtube video where he's using a 9v battery?
If so, I think his setup is doing basic electrolysis due to the cell having a pathway to ground via the transistor/FET. He has no chokes and only a coil in parallel with the cell. You can take a 9v battery and produce just as much HHO, if not more, as he is in the video.