Author Topic: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?  (Read 5544 times)

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2011, 20:26:27 pm »
I agree, the tech brief does seems to have a few things mixed together. I thought the sales manual kind of cleared a lot of it up.
Anyway, so if we have some kind of alternating field across the cell, how exactly is the gas being produced? The way I'm looking at it is once h20 is ionized into H2+ and O- on there respective side of the cell, the polarity switches and the ions collide  and transfer electrons, or collide with already released gases which would result in the release of electrons from the oxygen ion to then combine with the Hydrogen ions
what do you think?

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2011, 21:17:15 pm »
I think what may be happening is that during the first pulse the molecule splits, atoms become ions and are deflected, and then the polarity changes on the next pulse, then the ions are deflected in the opposite direction and the atoms (which are still part of molecules) are deflected toward each other and collide.

 I think there is both ion-molecule collision and molecule-molecule collision. I will try to use of of Meyer's diagrams later and draw this out so it can be better understood.

Oh BTW, Stan states in the tech brief (oage 1-7) that during the off time (gating period) the + ions recapture the free electrons in the water bath.

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2011, 01:36:23 am »
Here's a drawing I just made up of what I think the AC polarity reversal is doing in the Water Fuel Cell.
When the polarity changes the electrical attraction forces become replusion forces that increases collision ionization.
Although collision ionization also occurs in the electrical polarization process reversing the polarity keeps is going.
(http://i642.photobucket.com/albums/uu141/Hms-776/wfcinside.png)