Author Topic: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?  (Read 5543 times)

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Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« on: November 17, 2011, 22:59:47 pm »
Tony W's VIC waveforms show AC which is 180 degrees out pf phase at each connection.

In a series circuit with a diode there will be no AC. However, the coils themselves have a capacitance which turns them into parallel tank circuits. Whether or not there is a diode in the circuit the parallel tank circuits will oscillate and create AC.

The 180 degree out of phase ac at the voltage zones means that when one voltage zone is positive the other will be negative and with each pulse the voltage zones will change polarity. In this case the water molecules will be stretched but will also collide. This seems to resonate with what Stan Meyer has termed "Resonant Action" in which collision causes disassociation? Although when Meyer mentions "Resonant Action" he seems to be talking more about ions colliding with the molecules?

What do you guys think, is the polarity changing with each pulse?



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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2011, 01:42:06 am »
I ran a quick simulation and it looks as if the bottom choke is voltage output is switching between positive and negative but the top choke is staying positive because of the diode. I took a picture, take a look. The sales manual really outlines the importance of ion collision for the resonance cell. Do you think its possible to have both a static field and an alternating field?

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 02:05:08 am »
I'm not sure, I don't want to rule it out though. The vic resonance is something
That really gets me. I tend to think it's the chokes self resonance, which forms a
parallel tank that would limit current and provide an ac frequency, but the ac should
 be rectified by the diode and any series component (i.e. The water cap) would only
get the dc.

Bottom line is, there exists ac in this circuit, how it gets to the water capacitor
Is my question.

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 10:38:03 am »
I have tried and tried to get the pulse doubling effect on multisim but no luck. I have also tried to get AC to the water cap and again no luck? Just wondering again how the AC is occuring in a series circuit with a diode?

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2011, 08:17:38 am »
First off the oscope waveforms are from Tony's site Globalkast.com....Thanks to him for all the contributions he has made.

(http://globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/scope/SDC11038.JPG)
Description: "Signal from my VIC Transformer at resonance at each output, voltage is 180 degrees out of phase ( separated view )."


 Since each connection provides AC that is 180 out of phase then each voltage zone will change polarity with each pulse as you can see above.

When the two pulses combine they look like this:(http://globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/scope/SDC11039.JPG)

The above looks exactly like Meyer's waveforms, but we should realize that the signal is made up of 2 AC signals which are 180 out of phase. All the positive pulses do not go to the positive side of the capacitor as Meyer's diagrams seem to show. All the negative pulses do not go to the negative side of the capacitor as Meyer's diagrams seem to show.

This still is very confusing to me, and I guess everyone else, if it were simple we would have all figured it out by now.

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2011, 08:46:34 am »
(http://globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/scope/SDC10548.JPG)

Another one of Tony's oscope waveforms....

Both Dynodon and Tony have said resonance takes place between the L1 choke and the water capacitor...
When we study phase angles in AC circuits we find that inductive circuits cause the voltage to lead the current and in a capacitive circuit the voltage lags the current. So in the VIC circuit we have 2 seperate circuits, one that operates at resonance (L1 choke and water cap) and one that does not(L2 choke and Secondary coil).

 If the resonant part of the circuit is not exactly at resonance the circuit will be either more inductive or more capacitive causing a phase angle shift. When the shifted phase angle combines with the other through coupling the superposition of the out of phase voltage waves will create Amplitude modulation.

Another way this could occur is if the circuit (L1 and water cap) is exactly at resonance but the other half of the circuit (L2 and secondary) has inductive or capacitive characteristics that do not create a perfect 180 degree out of phase AC signal....

For now these are my theories, they have not been proven yet. I just hope others will share how they think the VIC is working. Once we get the VIC figured out the rest will not be that hard.

So everyone reading this please input your thoughts/knowledge/experimentation results etc so we can all learn from each other.


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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2011, 12:53:52 pm »
To offer another twist to the voltage zones changing polarity - read on the Garrett Water Carburettor patented in 1935.


http://keelynet.com/energy/garrett.htm

In order to provide for alternate evolution of the gases from the plates 36 and 38, a pole changer 41, shown in Figure 3 is provided, which is actuated periodically by the motor 42 which drives the worm 43 and the gear 44 and causes oscillations of the member 45 which is connected by a spring 46 to the arm 47, thereby causing the pole changer to snap from one position to the other.


i wonder what did they mean  by " to provide for alternate evolution of the gasses"

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Re: Did Stan Meyer's voltage zones change polarity with each pulse?
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2011, 19:52:27 pm »
That's interesting.

I definately think the changing polarity was utilized to produce more gas as it makes the dynamic forces even greater. The Tech brief shows a table of gas production when the voltage is stationary vs switching (Static Vs Dunamic) that shows the stationary voltage produces less gas.

« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 20:18:46 pm by HMS-776 »