Author Topic: How to build the vic tried and tested  (Read 37687 times)

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #56 on: August 20, 2011, 06:15:09 am »
spintronic,
 
yep, well understood, notice my 0-1 ampmeter on the positive lead, it rests below zero, the one on the right side is the input amps from the variace about .5 at about 50 volts... the primary wire small size keeps the input amps low,  I can run it up to over 100 volts and it still remains below zero, my small irfbc40 mosfet can't take it for very long though...  I'm in the market for a tougher mosfet, I like irfbc40 because they are super fast, 11ns rise time if I remember and cheap...
any mosfet suggestions?
kb
 

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #57 on: August 21, 2011, 02:45:35 am »
@kb
 
very interesting, what you have done is wire 3 transformers coils in series with a almost short circuit output (wfc), any idea how it works? for the ammeter to go less than zero its either not calibrated, wired reverse terminals or your current is running in the wrong direction. I would stick a beefy trany in with good overall figures for now, plenty of surplus equipment knocking about with suitable components.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 05:47:53 am by spintronic »

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #58 on: August 21, 2011, 05:46:12 am »
As i have said the primary magnetic field aligns surounding coils electrons so they form magnets that attract to each other (electron clustering)
 
We can see here how external fields affect electron spin.
 
When a piece of ferromagnetic material is placed into an external magnetic field, two things happen.
The spins in each domain shift so that the magnetic moments of the electrons become more aligned with the direction of the field.
Domains aligned with the field expand and take over regions previously occupied by domains aligned opposite to the field.
source http://electron9.phys.utk.edu/phys136d/modules/m7/material.htm

this covers permanent magnets but still has relevant information
 
"Instead, every electron is a tiny magnet due to its inherent magnetism (what we call electron spin).
Furthermore, the alignment of the electron spins makes a hunk of iron (magnetite) into a magnetic lodestone.
All atoms have electrons with electron spin and magnetic fields due to their orbits about the nucleus. But not all material is magnetic like the lodestone (ferromagnetic). If the electron spins of an atom's electrons are aligned oppositely, their magnetic fields cancel. That's what happens with tissue paper, flesh, or other non-ferromagnetic substances.
Each iron atom, on the other hand, has four electrons whose spin magnetism doesn't cancel. They line up. Aligned magnetic fields make matter magnetic.
Iron is a peculiar, remarkable substance. Its aligned-field electrons spontaneously couple and form small long-lasting domains. The spins inside these microscopic domains are almost perfectly aligned. Most domains, though, aren't aligned. In common un-magnetized iron, many domains are randomly oriented"
source http://www.usatoday.com/tech/columnist/aprilholladay/2005-04-01-wonderquest_x.htm

Some materials are unsuitable like copper here it explains why
 
Since all matter is made up of atoms and all atoms have electrons that are in motion, do all atoms have magnetic fields?
The answer to this question is yes and no. All the electrons do produce a magnetic field as they spin and orbit the nucleus; however, in some atoms, two electrons spinning and orbiting in opposite directions pair up and the net magnetic moment of the atom is zero. Remember that the direction of spin and orbit of the electron determines the direction of the magnetic field. Electron pairing occurs commonly in the atoms of most materials. In the experiment you observed a helium atom showing two electrons spinning and orbiting around the protons and neutrons of the nucleus. The two electrons are paired, meaning that they spin and orbit in opposite directions. Since the magnetic fields produced by the motion of the electrons are in opposite directions, they add up to zero. The overall magnetic field strength of atoms with all paired electrons is zero.
source http://www.ndt-ed.org/EducationResources/HighSchool/Magnetism/electronpairing.htm
 

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #59 on: August 21, 2011, 09:35:43 am »
but to form a magnetic field u have to have some current flow....without some current u have NO MAGNETIC FIELD!

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #60 on: August 21, 2011, 09:52:35 am »
good job we have current going through the primary then,tony
« Last Edit: August 22, 2011, 04:36:29 am by spintronic »

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #62 on: August 22, 2011, 20:59:57 pm »
Nice video  :)  seems like there should still be an oscilliating  signal  on the week force between the pulling.... maybe not.  like the vid :)
 

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Re: How to build the vic tried and tested
« Reply #63 on: August 22, 2011, 21:27:49 pm »
T & S & W
I was able to get up way over 2kv with a new core material.  My iron filing epoxy cores limited me to 1500v at 50v in at .5a in.  I've had wires wrong before once and seen the amp meter go backwards below zero, LOL.
I took an old 110/220 step up tranny and tore the wires (look like aluminum) apart and soaked it in alcohol to loosen the shellack between the EI laminate strips.  They came apart nicely.  I cut out the wide center post strips and made a nice rectangular core much like meyers. I reschellacked the strips, assembled it inside the four coils and am testing now.
Sure wish I had a clue what "tuning into the dielectric of water" means.
The iron wire came.  I was almost 85% done with a tight close perfect wind and it slipped in my hand and unwound like a spring.  This is not as easy as winding copper that's for certain.  Finger nails with grooves in them still hurt today.
kb